Chronology: Palestinian Affairs

The Middle East Journal, Summer 2009 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Palestinian Affairs


See also Arab-Israeli Conflict, Egypt, Israel, Lebanon

Jan. 18: Hamas claimed Palestinian Authority (PA) President Mahmud 'Abbas was responsible for the death of Sa'id Siam, Hamas' Interior Minister and leader of Hamas militias in Gaza, who was killed by Israeli forces during the December 2008-January 2009 invasion of the Gaza Strip. [JP, 1/18]

Jan. 22: Hamas admitted that it had executed Palestinians suspected of collaborating with Israel during the course of Israel's December 2008-January 2009 military operations in the Gaza Strip. Fatah claimed that 19 of its members were killed by Hamas, with many more tortured, and exhorted Hamas to cease pursuing Fatah members in Gaza. Hamas claimed that it had proof that Fatah aided Israeli warplanes in their bombing raids of the Gaza Strip, accusations that Fatah denied. [SFC, 1/22]

Jan. 30: A wave of reprisal killings erupted in Gaza following the Israeli invasion, resulting in 25-50 deaths. Most victims were Fatah members, escaped convicts, or suspected collaborators. Human rights groups believed that many of the killings were conducted by Hamas, but there was not enough evidence to indicate a coordinated Hamas campaign. [The Guardian, 1/30]

Feb 5: The Israeli Navy seized The Brotherhood Ship, a Lebanese boat carrying pro- Palestinian activists and humanitarian aid supplies to the Gaza Strip. Claiming that the ship was smuggling weapons to the Hamas run Palestinian enclave, Israeli patrol boats searched the vessel for weapons and diverted it to an Israeli port to take in the Lebanese activists for questioning. [NYT, 2/5]

Feb 6: The United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) announced a cessation of its relief activity in Gaza following Hamas' seizure of supplies from the agency on February 4 after Hamas had charged that the UN agency had been handing over the supplies to political opposition groups. [JP, 2/6, AP, 2/4]

After a day of questioning, Israel released the crew of The Brotherhood Ship. Among the activists was Archbishop Hilarion Capucci, a former Melkite Greek Catholic cleric in Jerusalem who had been deported in 1975 for alleged arms smuggling. [Al-Arabiya, 2/6]

Feb 9: Hamas issued an apology to the UNRWA for the seizure of aid supplies on February 4 and promised to return 3,500 blankets and 400 food parcels to the intended recipients. The UN agency reciprocated with an announcement that it would resume deliveries of humanitarian aid to Palestinian refugees, shut down since February 6. However, a UNRWA spokesman stated that Israeli restrictions in the lead-up to the February 10 Israeli elections would make delivery efforts difficult. [BBC 2/9]

Feb. 13: Thirteen prisoners escaped from a PA prison in the West Bank city of Jericho. According to the PA, most of the prisoners were members of the al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades and several were wanted by Israel. The PA set up a committee to investigate the veracity of the guards' story that the fugitives escaped via underground tunnels amid suspicions that guards were involved in the escape. [MNA, 2/13, Ynet, 2/14]

Feb. 14: Six of the 13 prisoners who escaped from Jericho prison on February 13 were apprehended by PA police.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Chronology: Palestinian Affairs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.