Birthday by the Bay

By Crowley, Carolyn Hughes | The Saturday Evening Post, March 1995 | Go to article overview

Birthday by the Bay


Crowley, Carolyn Hughes, The Saturday Evening Post


Among the celebrants of the 300th anniversary of Annapolis, Maryland, are mobcapped women wearing working-class clothes from the mid-1750s to 1790s--the city's "golden age."

"I'm a woman of property," says guide Pam Williams. "I own a tavern that I inherited when I was widowed. My mobcap keeps my hair clean, so I wash it once or twice a year. To wash it more often would be dangerous. I have no right or left foot to my buckled shoes, so I change them each day to wear them out the same."

Her feet don't hurt her a whit, she tells us, as we hurry down the narrow brick streets of the city's historic district. We pass numerous seafood restaurants, cozy inns, old Georgian colonial homes, and clapboard row houses.

Annapolis' thoroughfares radiate like spokes from two hilltop circles, the centers of political and ecclesiastical authority. Two grand domes watch over this living colonial town of about 34,000 persons. The looming white dome at State Circle belongs to the State House, the nation's oldest capitol in continuous legislative use.

After the American Revolution, when Annapolis served as the U.S. capital for nine months, George Washington made a tearful address in the Senate chamber of the State House and resigned his commission as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army.

Three weeks later, the Continental Congress returned to this simple room to ratify the Treaty of Paris, officially ending the Revolutionary War. Today, a life-size mannequin of General Washington stands before rows of leather-topped wooden desks. The 188-member General Assembly meets in the State House for only 90 days each winter.

Synonymous with Annapolis is the United States Naval Academy, which celebrates its 150th birthday this year. A visit to the city would not be complete without a stop at the Academy, where some 1,200 plebes (first-year midshipmen) begin their studies each July. For seven weeks they endure 17-hour days as they learn to march smartly with their M-1 rifles along the academy's walkways. The four-year bill for a midshipman's tax-paid, 140-hour program is approximately $200,000. Discipline, sports, and an honor concept foster leadership in a Spartan setting. The institution allows no televisions in a midshipman's room, and no "mids" can have cars at the academy until they are seniors.

Frequently during the school year, the academy's more than 4,000 midshipmen gather outdoors in front of the multiwinged Bancroft Hall--the largest dormitory under one roof in the country. The facility contains five miles of hallways and 33 acres of floor space. Each noon the brigade officers ask for an accounting of those present; the students then salute the flag and march to military music into the 55,000-square-foot dining hall for lunch.

"You have a sense of the future when you watch the exercise," explains Williams, our guide. "You hope only good will happen to them because they're so vital and well-intentioned. Color and pageantry are everywhere. If you happen into this gathering, you're lucky. It lasts about 15 minutes."

On Friday afternoons in the spring and fall, the midshipmen march in full-dress parades at Worden Field; each Wednesday afternoon, they practice at the same location. When they are marching, saluting, and handling their rifles, they make every move as a unit.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Birthday by the Bay
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.