Delivering Next Generation Learning: The Diploma Support Programme

By Mazliah, Mandy | Teaching Business & Economics, Spring 2009 | Go to article overview

Delivering Next Generation Learning: The Diploma Support Programme


Mazliah, Mandy, Teaching Business & Economics


By September 2009, ten diplomas will be available to 14-19 year-olds across England, including the Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance (BAF). To help teachers delivering or preparing the deliver these awards, the diploma support programme offers educational training and expertise. The programme is delivered on behalf of the Learning and Skills Improvement Service (LSIS) by a partnership led by the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust (SSAT).

"The best thing about the Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance," says Diane Worrall, the diploma support programme's line lead for the Diploma in BAF, "is that it offers opportunities for the learner to develop entrepreneurial skills and learn in different environments with the support of employers."

Andrew Grimley, development and communications director at Young Enterprise UK agrees: "We believe that employer engagement is crucial to ensuring that young people develop the skills, knowledge and experience they need for the world of work and the Diploma in BAF provides a great opportunity for schools, colleges and employers to work together."

The diploma is a new way of teaching and learning. Each practitioner and consortium will face their own challenges and development needs, and support is critical throughout the process. The diploma support programme offers this support and can be personalised to the needs of practitioners.

The programme is free and combines face-to-face training, remote advice and support, professional networking opportunities, support materials and personalised online tools, all providing excellence in professional development suited to individual needs,

Diploma training workshops

"Inside the Workplace" workshops are essential for diploma team staff. They will take place in employer venues relevant to the line of learning across the country. Employers that are already involved include Microsoft, Tate and LyIe, Argos and BT Delegates will:

* gain experience of a working environment and develop strategies to engage with the sectors related to their diploma line of learning

* discover how to apply and embed work-related learning to the diploma

* find out how to get assistance with the 50 per cent applied learning requirement

* receive a set of line-specific materials to take away,

Booking can be made through the diploma support programme website, where you can also find information about dates and venues. Visit: www.diploma-support.org/trainingandsupport/insidetheworkplace

Bespoke training and consultancy

Three days of free training per line of learning is available to all consortia who will be delivering a diploma from September 2009. There are seven themes and 19 topics available, which cover a wide range of areas including pedagogical approaches, curriculum planning and diploma delivery. Plan ahead and make full use of the wide-ranging offer that can be tailored to practitioners' needs. For more information or to apply please go to: www.diploma-support.org/trainingandsupport/ bespoke

Further training and support

There is range of further training and support that can be provided through the programme.

* Vocational and applied learning training - training and consultancy is available on a wide range of generic topics around applied and vocational qualifications and phase 1 diplomas.

* Information, advice and guidance - support, consultancy and IAG networks are available.

* Support materials - a suite of high-quality generic and subject-specific print, online and multimedia materials are available for practitioners at all stages of their diploma delivery development.

* Diploma line of learning networks - these networks will enable line leads and practitioners to transfer skills, knowledge and understanding that are aligned to the themes of personalised learning, assessment, generic learning skills, information, advice and guidance, working collaboratively and reflective practice. …

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