FACULTY PERCEPTIONS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING: "I Don't Get No Respect"

By Harrison, Elizabeth | Nursing Education Perspectives, July/August 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

FACULTY PERCEPTIONS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING: "I Don't Get No Respect"


Harrison, Elizabeth, Nursing Education Perspectives


NURSING EDUCATION RESEARCH

ABSTRACT

Best practices in teaching and learning may begin with effective academic advising. Nursing research and scholarship in the area of advising, however, is virtually non-existent. The purpose of this exploratory study was to determine nurse faculty perceptions of the characteristics and functions of an effective academic adviser. The study was conducted at a comprehensive state university in southeastern Minnesota. Content analysis of 17 completed questionnaires was consistent with extant education and pedagogical research. Authenticity and accountability were unique characteristics of an effective adviser identified by participants in this study. The findings will facilitate faculty development in the area of academic advising and help improve services to students. Further, the results have helped identify areas for continuing scholarship in nursing.

Key Words Academic Advising - Perceptions of Advising - Adviser Characteristics - Adviser-Advisee Relationship

THE LATE COMEDIAN RODNEY DANGERFIELD'S FAMOUS LINE, "I DON'T GET NO RESPECT," COULD HAVE BEEN SPOKEN BY AN ACADEMIC ADVISER. Among the responsibilities associated with faculty positions in academe, student advising is likely to be given short shrift compared to teaching, research, and service. For example, Johnson and Zlotnik (2005) found that only 7-5 percent of ads for academic jobs included advising as a job requirement, and that just one of 636 ads reviewed requested evidence of effectiveness as an adviser. From a nursing perspective, research and scholarship in the area of academic advising, not to mention general recognition and attention to advising, are virtually nonexistent. * The lack of respect and attention given to advising responsibilities is not new. In 1979 Walsh wrote, "Academic advisement has been neither a highly desirable academic responsibility nor a highly rewarded one" (p. 446). Walsh summarized the role of the adviser as largely a bureaucratic activity involving record keeping and ensuring that students fulfill college and major requirements prior to graduation; he called for a revitalization and redefinition of academic advisement as well as the application of developmental theory to the process of advising. * It is safe to say that the revitalization and redefinition called for by Walsh have not seen fruition. While an accurate evaluation of the changes in academic advising over time is a difficult task, it is likely that the process of academic advising remains largely bureaucratic. This may be particularly true in departments of nursing because of the high adviser/advisee ratio and the particular rigors of the nursing major.

Background The role of faculty in academic advising dates to 1841, when Kenyon College stipulated that each student must select a faculty member to be an adviser. Faculty provided students with information about courses needed to graduate, transmitting or translating information found in the college catalogue (Kramer, 1995). According to Habley (1995), "the only historical constant in academic advising is that members of the faculty have always played a prominent role in the delivery of those services" (p. 11).

The advent of student development theory in the late 1960s marked a milestone in the history of academic advising. Chickering's model of seven vectors (1969) is among the more well-known and utilized theories of student development. Based on the psychosocial theories of Erickson, Levinson, and others, it provided impetus for the developmental advising theories of Crookston, O'Banion, and many other academic advising theorists.

Contemporary theorists are challenging the reliance on developmental theory. According to Smith and Allen (2006), the 30year-old developmental approach does not represent recent changes in higher education and may not have utility for advising students in the 21st century. Aune's application of the interaction model of disability (2000), Propp and Rhodes's model of adviser behavioral constructs (2006), Schultz's modeling and role-modeling nursing theory (1998), and Kadar's counseling liaison model (2001) are examples of current advising theories that reflect the needs of today's student.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FACULTY PERCEPTIONS OF ACADEMIC ADVISING: "I Don't Get No Respect"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.