Recipes, the Internet and Nutritional Guidance

By Hertzler, Ann A.; Chen, Chung-Yen | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Recipes, the Internet and Nutritional Guidance


Hertzler, Ann A., Chen, Chung-Yen, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


College students in an Introductory Nutrition course were instructed to find and report on three recipes sites for one of nine antioxidant vegetables. We surveyed the sites for number and kinds accessed, the forms of nutrition information, and the credentials of those involved.

Recipes, the Internet, and Nutritional Guidance

Historically, home economists and dietitians have promoted the concept of nutritious food and the development of reliable recipes (Guthrie, 1977; Hertzler, 1983; DuSablon, 1994). Endless searches by consumers (CDS-Cookbook Disorder Syndrome) do not necessarily result in recipes based on current nutrition guidelines, lifestyles, or the food ways of cultural groups (Hertzler et al., 1999). The Internet is a prime recipe source for college students, many of whom will soon become working singles or part of dual career families (Hertzler & Frary, 1995). Because of the explosive nature of the Internet's World Wide Web for nutrition and health information and the changing roles of family food preparers, an exploratory study was conducted to learn what kinds of food and nutrition information consumers are accessing from Web recipes. We investigated the number and kinds of recipe Web sites accessed by college students, the forms of nutrition information associated with these sites, and the credentials of those providing the information.

Methods

College students (39 males, 106 females) in an Introductory Nutrition course were surveyed because of their nutrition knowledge, cooking experience, Internet use, and projected entry into the work force. Because college students' links with nutrition resources have been positively and significantly associated with lower fat intakes but not with higher or lower vitamin or mineral intakes, we decided to select an area of the Dietary Guidelines (Johnson & Kennedy, 2000) rather than a total diet approach. Antioxidant vegetables (carotenoids, isothiosyanates, C, or E) were chosen as a recipe focus because of their importance in reducing cancer and cardiovascular disease risks (Hertzler & Frary, 1992; Van Durn & Pivonka, 2000). Students were directed to select one of nine commonly consumed dark green/orange or cruciferous vegetables (Table 1), search the Web in whatever fashion they chose using the same or different sites, and tsubmit the URLs for up to three recipes.

Recipe Sites

All reported URLs were keyed into a Web browser in December 2000, tabulated by category (.com, .edu, .gov, org, net), and analyzed for designated information by the authors. The number of times each site was listed was not counted because some students used the same site for all of their recipes, no site was used by more than 12 students, and embedded- and cross-linked sites complicated tracking. Approximately twelve sites listed on student reports were inactive at the time of the search or they prohibited entry without registration.

Food/Nutrition Information

Each recipe site was reviewed for the presence and form of written guidance, food guides, Nutrition Facts Label (NFL), nutrient analysis, or general educational features included with the recipe pages. The Homepage of each recipe site was used to search for credentials of those involved and for food and nutrition information.

Recipes selected by each student were classified using five categories - main dish (included protein source), vegetable/salad, soup, bread, dessert (cake, cookies) in order to show choices. The results illustrate what consumers may or may not be learning about nutrition and suggest educational pointers to guide professionals designing recipe pages.

Results

Students commented on the ease of using search engines to locate recipes on the Web for one of the specified vegetables just by its name, or categorized by cuisine, main ingredient, season of the year, cooking method, quick preparation, and menu item. Table 1 shows that for this assignment, vegetables most often selected were broccoli, tomatoes, greens, and sweet potatoes, and in the form of a main dish. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Recipes, the Internet and Nutritional Guidance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.