Caught with the Catch

By Baumüller, Heike | The World Today, October 2009 | Go to article overview

Caught with the Catch


Baumüller, Heike, The World Today


iLLEGAL FISHING CONTINUES SERIOUSLY TO undermine the sustainability of the world's fisheries and cause huge financial losses of some $10-23.5 billion annually. Illegal activities are especially prevalent in nations with weak government, making developing countries particularly vulnerable.

European fisheries are not immune. An assessment of five largemarine ecosystems around Europe predicts that by 2020, over $14.5 billion in catches, $11.6 billion in stock value and 27,000 jobs could be lost if nothing is done to deal with the problem. European fishing interests are also threatened on the high seas and in other countries' waters where illegal fishing affects the catches of the continent's distant water fleets.

To deal with this, a new European Union (EU) regulation comes into force in January aimed at combating illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in European waters and beyond. It is one of themost ambitious pieces of EU legislation to promote improvements in environmentalmanagement outside the Union.

The regulation aims to ensure that anyone who wishes to land or export fish and fish products to the EU can only do so if the country under whose flag the fish was caught can show that it has laws and regulations to conserve and manage itsmarine resources, and that these are enforced. The EU can blacklist vessels that are found to have been fishing illegally and countries that fail to take action to prevent, deter and eliminate illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

CERTIFIED CATCH

One of the central elements of the regulation is a requirement for any imports of fish products into the EU to be accompanied by a catch certificate. The certificate is provided by the flag state of the fishing vessel to certify that catches have beenmade legally in accordance with regulations and international conservation and managementmeasures.

The European Commission will only accept certificates of a given flag state once that country has confirmed that 'it has in place national arrangements for the implementation, control and enforcement of laws, regulations and conservation andmanagementmeasures'. Certificates will need to be passed along the entire supply chain, including processors that import and then re-export fish to the EU.

If a vessel is found to be engaged in illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, the Commission can add it to a list of such boats. Among the punitivemeasures, listed boats will not be allowed to fish in European waters, enter the port of an EUmember state, and import to or export fromthe Union.

A country can also be listed by decision of the European Council if it has failed to implement adequatemeasures to deal with recurrent illegal fishing by vessels flying its flag, fishing in its waters or using its ports, as well as to preventmarket access for illegally caught fishery products.

Actions against such so-called 'non-cooperating third countries' include prohibiting imports of fish products from vessels flying their flag and a freeze on negotiating new fisheries partnership agreements with the EU to grant European fleets access to a listed country's waters, as well as possible termination of existing agreements. In addition, the EU can implement short-termemergencymeasures if actions by a third country undermine conservation and management by a regional fisheries management organisation.

CONCERNS SURFACE

Concerns have started to surface, in particular among developing countries andmajor processors, about their ability to comply with the regulations in time.Many exporters to the EU will be required to revise their regulations and strengthenmonitoring, control and traceability. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Caught with the Catch
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.