Impact of Staff Morale on Performance in School Organizations

By Nicholas-Omoregbe, Olanike S | Ife Psychologia, March 2009 | Go to article overview
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Impact of Staff Morale on Performance in School Organizations


Nicholas-Omoregbe, Olanike S, Ife Psychologia


Abstract

The relationship between the morale of staff (i.e. teachers' morale) and performance in school organizations was looked at in this study. The research was carried out on a randomly selected sample of one hundred and twenty (120) students and teaching staff from the three colleges in Covenant University, Ota, Ogun State. Remuneration and Recognition were used to measure morale while teaching effectiveness was used as a variable for performance. It was discovered that staff morale has a significant effect on performance in school organizations.

Introduction

Morale is the emotional reaction of a person to his job. Diverse elements of morale are: courage, enthusiasm, zeal, discipline, and readiness to stand hardship (Otu, 1998). According to him, morale also refers to the condition of a group where there are obvious and set group goals that are felt to be central and incorporated with personal goals.

Morale is a primary problem influencing the development and success of a school. Bentley and Rempel (1980) describe morale as the professional interest and zeal that an individual shows towards the attainment of individual and group goals in a given job situation. Low morale is correlated with frustration, trauma, hostility and helplessness. While high morale is connected with fulfillment, belongingness, success and personal and group value (Sinclair, 1992).

Schools can be erected and as well be equipped with all required facilities and gifted with properly qualified staff. Much older schools can also be refurbished and made better by individuals, organizations or government, nonetheless the educational system may not thrive unless teachers who are the core of the organization are well cared for in terms of recognition/ appreciation, participation in decision making process, timely payment of good pay and added benefits, thriving school discipline, substantial work loads, etc.

It is a chief role for the school manager to influence the morale of his subordinates. The key functions of the school head as a manager in planning, organizing, supervising, communicating, coordinating, motivating and controlling all have important association for school morale. Looking at it from the teachers' outlook, the school head's management of those functions has a strong bearing on the level of performance they obtain from teaching.

Boosting the Morale of Teachers

The effectiveness of school administration is measured by the extent to which it adds to teaching and learning (Otu, 2006). A school head makes his biggest contribution by providing and holding them on them job, and by endowing them and their students with capable and enough working tools and creating a conducive environment in which they can work. A pleasant and emotional climate for staff and students in school setting has the mysterious powers of boosting staff morale and enhancing their self-investment in their work. Colleagues should frequently be injected with zeal by school managers by regarding their observations, recognizing their worth, making policy matters plain to them and trusting their capabilities and disabilities. Informal communications between the school head and staff will eliminate element of fear, antagonism and suspicion whilst at the same time enhancing good relationship.

Aside from been friendly and available to staff by school heads, they must be flexible and willing to achieve the essential feasible and practicable transformation in their administration. Fair sharing of available fringe benefits to commendable and worthy staff would facilitate the raising of personal prestige of personnel.

Making teachers feel that they can take responsibility to make improvements in the teaching and learning situation in the school,

motivates them to perform and feel satisfied (Ellis on Herzberg 1984). Teachers, who feel cherished and allowed to take on innovative tasks, have their morale increased to perform better.

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Impact of Staff Morale on Performance in School Organizations
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