North Carolina Surveys HOE Teachers

By Richards, Beverly | Vocational Education Journal, February 1995 | Go to article overview

North Carolina Surveys HOE Teachers


Richards, Beverly, Vocational Education Journal


A statewide survey of health occupations teachers was recently completed by the North Carolina Health Occupations Education Task Force on Teacher Qualifications. The instrument addressed duties of the health occupations teacher in seven areas: program planning, HOSA management, guidance and counseling, classroom management, school-to-work transition, program evaluation and professional development. Respondents were asked to rate the perceived importance of these functions for the present and for the year 2000 and beyond. They rated-functions on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 meaning very low importance and 5 meaning very high importance. The survey was sent to all teachers with at least four years of teaching experience. Of 67 surveys sent, 37 were returned.

Here are the results:

Program planning responses reported means ranging from 3.82 to 4.73 for the present and 4.17 to 4.86 for the future. T-tests reveal significant differences between present and future means in 9 of the 11 functions. The two exceptions were using VoCATS annual plan and developing lesson plans.

HOSA management responses showed means ranging from 3.79 to 4.45 for the present and 4.03 to 4.65 for the future. T-tests found significant differences between past and present emphasis in two of the six functions, motivating students to accept leadership responsibilities and conducting community awareness activities.

Guidance and counseling responses reported means ranging from 3.79 to 4.94 for the present and 4.71 to 4.97 for the future. Significant differences were indicated in only one of the four functions: interpreting student interest and aptitude surveys for student recruitment and career counseling for four-year course plans.

Classroom management responses showed means ranging from 3.67 to 4.88 for the present and 4.40 to 5 for the future. Significant differences were found in six of eight functions. The two exceptions were instilling an appreciation in students for a safe, clean classroom and clinical environment and preparing students to apply sound health care practices that emphasize efficiency and effectiveness. Respondents reported the highest mean in the section as the significance placed on conducting classroom and laboratory activities in a safe and efficient manner using OSHA, CDC, OBRA guidelines.

School-to-work transition responses reported means ranging from 4.55 to 4.91 for the present and 4.74 to 4. …

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