From Age to Age: How Christians Have Celebrated the Eucharist

By Cinson, Victor P. | Pastoral Music, October 2009 | Go to article overview

From Age to Age: How Christians Have Celebrated the Eucharist


Cinson, Victor P., Pastoral Music


From Age to Age: How Christians Have Celebrated the Eucharist Revised and Expanded Edition. Edward Foley, Capuchin. The Liturgical Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-8146-3078-5. 392 pages, paperback. $29.95.

The first edition of this work was described by many as, "a rich feast of insight, knowledge, and information about Eucharistic history and practice through the centuries." Now Edward Foley's revised and expanded edition of From Age to Age is an even more valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding and appreciating the Christian Eucharist than the original proved to be sixteen years ago. This revision, at nearly twice the size of the original, is a welcome addition to any liturgical library. For all who have not had the opportunity to discover the riches of the first edition, this book is a must for your reading list. You will be sure to walk away with a renewed love of, appreciation for, and understanding of the Eucharist as it has evolved throughout the ages.

Taking seriously the feedback on the original edition from reviews as well as input from students and teachers, laity, and professional liturgists, Foley offers an even fuller explanation of the various facets involved in understanding the liturgical tradition from the perspective of architecture, music, books, vessels, and Eucharistic theology during each of the seven major transitions offered in his outline: Emerging Christianity: The First Century; The Domestic Church: 100-313; The Rise of the Roman Church: 313-750; The Germanization of the Liturgy: 750-1073; Synthesis and Antithesis as Prelude to Reform: 1073-1517; Reform and Counter-Reform: 1517-1903; and Renewal, Reaction, and an Unfolding Vision: 1903 to Tomorrow.

There is something for everyone in From Age to Age. It is an excellent introduction for the interested lay person as well as a textbook, even at the graduate level. This revised edition offers more technical terms and words from languages other than English, which are translated and explained for the reader whenever they first occur in the text. (It appears that this arrangement incorporates the brief glossary from the first edition into the text of the current volume.) This edition also offers even more excellent illustrations, floor plans, maps, photos of buildings and objects, musical notations, and quotations in the wide margins than those found in the earlier edition, which provide a broader perspective on Eucharistic history and practice. …

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