From the Editors

By Betts, Brenda; Schell, Emily M. | Social Studies Review, Spring 2009 | Go to article overview

From the Editors


Betts, Brenda, Schell, Emily M., Social Studies Review


Most of our students - all teacher credential candidates - enter our Teacher Education programs with a similar introduction: / want to make a difference in the lives of children. We are fairly certain that these comments have echoed throughout the halls of K- 12 campuses as well institutions of higher education for generations. We know that teachers desire to make a difference in the lives of children. However, we wonder about those children and how they make a difference in our lives. What influences a child to embrace a cause and work tirelessly toward a solution? How does a child effectively approach a problem and what tools are at that child's disposal? Who and where are these children who advocate for others, the environment, and issues that may seem unsurmountable?

Guest Editor Dr. Brenda Betts introduced her idea for this issue's theme almost two years ago. She has since worked closely with her own teacher credential candidate students as well as veteran educators and fellow professors to develop a diverse collection of articles around the theme How do Children Make a Difference? The results are unique, informative, and inspiring. This issue features articles that are based in real-world examples of students in action. We trust you will enjoy learning about the remarkable ideas, inventions, solutions, and strategic plans developed by children who identified a need, asked lots of questions, and then got to work.

We hope that you will see your students (and perhaps yourself) in many of these stories. We encourage you to share these examples with your students and follow the examples presented - by supporting established programs or creating new ones to meet a need that exists in your own community. Part of the success of these children who made a difference is their ability to inspire others to continue seeking and making a difference - regardless of their age and access to resources.

This issue also features two Special Interest articles submitted by Dr. Tom Owens (Sacramento, CA), and Jacob Neumann (Houston, TX) related to students and Social Studies literature. Owens' article features questions asked by fourth grade students reading Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl as a selection in their reading program. While the reading program is widely used in California classrooms, our History-Social Science Standards do not provide adequate context for this historical period. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From the Editors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.