Kendall Ciesmier: Kids Caring 4 Kids

By McDaniel, Jessica; Perry, Mark | Social Studies Review, Spring 2009 | Go to article overview

Kendall Ciesmier: Kids Caring 4 Kids


McDaniel, Jessica, Perry, Mark, Social Studies Review


Kendall Ciesmier is a kid who is definitely making a difference with her charitable organization, Kids Caring for Kids, also known as KC4K. In 2004, 1 1-year-old Kendall became motivated to help other children after she watched an Oprah Winfrey show about the twelve million AIDS orphans in Africa. Kendall began her extraordinary charitable work by adopting a child through World Vision with her own annual contribution of $360.00. What makes Kendall's story all the more amazing is that in 2004 she underwent two liver transplant operations! She has shown that courage and caring for others can exist even when someone is in a great time of need. Kendall set up an online donation site and began accepting donations via the Internet. Kids Caring 4 Kids Mission Statement is:

"Our goal is to inspire others, particularly kids, to support others in need."

Kendall's website can be viewed at http://www.kidscaring4kids.org/

Kendall has pledged that the donations will be used to support other charitable organizations and individuals who help those whose lives have been impacted by the AIDS pandemic. The recipients of the donations are primarily in Africa and are designated for those who strive to help children. Kendall's efforts have earned nearly $640,000 in donations and is fast approaching her one million dollar goal. Kendall recently revealed the success of her charity on the Oprah Winfrey Show.

In September 2007, Kendall was surprised when she was snatched out of school by President Clinton and brought to an airing of the Oprah Winfrey Show. President Clinton made the announcement that an anonymous donor had just donated $500,000 dollars to Kids Caring 4 Kids! Kendall also received a $5,000 scholarship.

Kendall has also been instrumental in motivating at least half a dozen local schools in her hometown of Wheaton, Illinois, to generate thousands of dollars to support her cause and related charities. Kendall's leadership and initiative are the example that children need for the future.

Kendall's exceptional commitment to helping other kids is based upon her generosity, courage and integrity. Her exemplary actions are a true inspiration to all people children and adults alike everywhere in the world. She is an amazing young woman, so more people need to hear her story and learn of her vision. When ABC reporter Harry Porterfield wrote about Kendall, he said, "She really is someone you ought to know."

Standards for History-Social Science and the Visual and Performing Arts

Grade 2: 2.5

Grades 9 Through 12: Introduction:

Historical and Social Sciences Analysis Skills, Chronological and Spatial Thinking, Historical Research, Evidence, Point of View and Historical Interpretation.

Grade 10: 10.10andl0.ll

Visual and Performing Arts Standards

2.0 Creative Expression, 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context, 5.0 Connections, Relationships and Applications.

How has AIDS changed Africa?

In sub-Saharan Africa, AIDS is the leading cause of death for adults between ages 15-59. Thus, AIDS has affected every aspect of human life in Africa. The hospitals in Africa are filled to capacity. More than 50% of the hospitalized patients are infected with HIV Furthermore, people infected with HIV are hospitalized four times longer than the average patient, thus occupying many hospital beds for a substantial amount of time. There are not enough hospitals to take care of all of the sick people; so many people are not admitted into hospitals until the later stages of their illness , resulting in a less likely chance of recovery.

Moreover, children have become the true victims of AIDS in Africa. Although many children are actually infected with AIDS, many other children are affected by AIDS. It has been estimated that 12 million children in sub-Saharan Africa have lost either one or both of their parents due to AIDS.

Furthermore, if both parents die, the children are often left as orphans.

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