Internet Access and Internet Purchasing Patterns of Farm Households

By Mishra, Ashok K.; Williams, Robert P. et al. | Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, October 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Internet Access and Internet Purchasing Patterns of Farm Households


Mishra, Ashok K., Williams, Robert P., Detre, Joshua D., Agricultural and Resource Economics Review


The Internet is becoming an increasingly important management tool in production agriculture. Using data from the 2004 Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) and a double-hurdle estimation approach, we explore the adoption of computers with Internet access by and Internet purchasing patterns of farm households. Adoption of the Internet is positively related to age and education of the operator, off-farm work, presence of spouse, participation in government programs, farm size, and regional location of the farm. Internet purchasing patterns of farm households are positively related to the education of the operator and spouse, presence of teenagers, and regional location of the farm. Finally, farm businesses and their households are more likely to purchase a greater percentage of non-durable goods through the Internet as distances to markets increase.

Key Words: adoption of Internet, education, farm size, farm households, Internet, doublehurdle model, farm business, major household items, minor farm inputs

(ProQuest: ... denotes formulae omitted.)

The Internet is a strategic technology that is used across all sectors of the economy (Cohen et al. 2001). Farming and other agriculture-related industries are no exception (Kinsey 2001). While participation in federal government programs is only one reason that America's farmers use the Internet, it is perhaps the primary reason for an increased interest in Internet use among farmers.1 While data available from the USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) does not include information regarding farmers' electronic program participation, it does enable researchers to evaluate the ability of farmers to access the Internet from their homes and/or business locations.2 It is important to note that the value of the Internet extends beyond its role in farming and economic activity to include the social realm as well. The Internet permits the formation of online (virtual) communities and access to cultural and social networks beyond an individual's locality (Wellman et al. 1996). As a social entity, a family farm consists of a dual organizational structure-a farm business and a household consisting of the farm operator and family members. The implication for Internet adoption is that in addition to the farm business, the Internet has many uses for the farm household.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, approximately 62 percent of U.S. households own a computer and nearly 75 percent of U.S. households with a phone line have access to the Internet (Nielsen// NetRatings 2004). The Internet has steadily penetrated rural areas in recent years, and more than half of rural adults-52 percent-now go online (Mishra and Park 2005). Rural residents are enthusiastic users of the Internet and were early adopters of this technology-45 percent of rural residents go online daily.

Previous studies have focused on computer adoption by farmers and Internet adoption/use by farmers (Putler and Zilberman 1988, Batte, Jones, and Schnitkey 1990, Ortmann, Patrick, and Musser 1994, Mishra and Park 2005). Other studies have examined computer and/or Internet adoption and its impact on economic performance of the farm business (Lazarus and Smith 1988, Willimack 1989, Batte 2005). Internal factors such as record-keeping, decision-making, and production processes are some of the reasons for computer adoption by farmers (Holt 1985). External factors such as Internet research and marketing might also play an important role through the growth of information that has competitive value (Feder and Slade 1984). For example, farmers can use the Internet to search for input supplies and to locate potential buyers of their products, increasing their efficiency (via true market conditions). Wojan (2003) noted-but did not empirically evaluate- the potential benefits from farmers' Internet use.

The adoption of computers with Internet access may be due to several factors; for example, presence of a spouse who is working off the farm, the number of adult children who are exposed to Internet technology in schools, and off-farm businesses owned by farm operators and/or spouses that use the Internet to market and advertise their business's products to potential clients.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Internet Access and Internet Purchasing Patterns of Farm Households
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.