Evaluation of a Self-Paced Learning Module to Teach Responsible Literature Searching for Research**

By Wessel, Charles B.; Tannery, Nancy Hrinya et al. | Journal of the Medical Library Association, January 2010 | Go to article overview

Evaluation of a Self-Paced Learning Module to Teach Responsible Literature Searching for Research**


Wessel, Charles B., Tannery, Nancy Hrinya, Epstein, Barbara A., Journal of the Medical Library Association


BACKGROUND

The unanticipated death of a healthy research study volunteer at a major university highlighted the importance of a comprehensive and exhaustive literature review in conducting responsible research [I]. When this unfortunate event was investigated, it became evident that many researchers who perform literature searches have little guidance about what constitutes an appropriate or sufficient search to support human subject research. The researcher in that study had completed a basic search of MEDLINE and recent texts but had not conducted an extensive search, thereby missing relevant published research [2, 3]. After many of its members conducted literature searches themselves, the committee assigned to investigate this event found it was divided on what constitutes a sufficient literature search to support human subject research [4].

The Medical Library Association (MLA) recommended development of standards for literature searching to help institutional review boards assess the quality and comprehensiveness of literature searches in studies under review, and the association developed a policy statement on the role of expert searching in the health sciences [5-7]. Ln an article published long before this unfortunate event, Cullen and Mason decried the lack of standards for health sciences literature searching:

medical researchers are not required to account for the rigor of the literature review in the same way as they are required to account for experimental design, methodology and accurate reporting of findings in the research report which it precedes. They are trained in science but not in the bibliographical structure of their own discipline. [8]

PLANNING

To address this educational need, the Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) at the University of Pittsburgh developed "Responsible Literature Searching for Research: A Self-Paced Interactive Educational Program (RLS)" in 2003, with funding from the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL), through a cooperative agreement between the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the Office of Research Integrity (ORI), US Department of Health and Human Services [9]. The project was proposed in response to a request for applications from ORI and AAMC for initiatives to promote the responsible conduct of research, including development of an online curriculum module.

RLS is an instructional tool aimed at teaching clinical researchers the fundamentals of effective literature searching for research practice. The program is self-paced, allowing users to work through the program with no restrictions on pace or order. The program consists of nine chapters with didactic information, practice guidelines, examples, and supplementary materials, and it includes tests and quizzes to measure knowledge gained. The RLS program objectives are to teach and describe generally accepted practices and principles associated with the biomedical literature search process. These practices and principles include appropriate use and limitations of major information resources, guidelines for responsible literature searching, HSLS resources and services available to support the literature search process, role of reference librarians in this process, and best approaches for specialized topics such as drug safety and identification of adverse events.

Because the module is based on principles applicable in most research-oriented settings, the cooperative agreement with AAMC/ORI specified that the content be freely available to other academic health sciences libraries and medical centers to adapt to their local settings and resources.

An advisory committee of experienced medical reference librarians · from major institutions (Yale University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, George Washington University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Medical College of Georgia libraries), as well as eight HSLS reference librarians, evaluated the RLS content and test questions before deployment.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Evaluation of a Self-Paced Learning Module to Teach Responsible Literature Searching for Research**
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.