In Focus: North Carolina's Shelley Crisp

By Schlosser, Jim | Humanities, January/February 2010 | Go to article overview

In Focus: North Carolina's Shelley Crisp


Schlosser, Jim, Humanities


THROUGH HER OFFICE WINDOW. SHELLEY CRISP CAN SEE the humanities in action. We are looking at Greensboro's Center City Park, the walkways, grass commons, stone benches, fountains, and concert stage - an ideal place to escape, if briefly, from the workaday world.

"You see people of every stripe playing, attending concerts, reading, and talking - the humanities are right there," says Crisp, executive director of the North Carolina Humanities Council. A native North Carolinian with a strong affinity for "place," Crisp tends to see the humanities in the stories of the many peoples who make up the quickly changing and fast-growing state. There are the stories of tobacco farming and fishing families, who have lived off the land and ocean for generations, and newcomers who might speak Spanish, Hmong, or Arabic. People don't realize that 264 languages are spoken in the homes of North Carolina, says Crisp.

When the council was established thirty-eight years ago, the state was about to go through a major shift, from a rural lifestyle to a more urban one. 'At such times, there's a transitional crisis," says Crisp, and the council's founders wanted to do humanities programs that might ease the tension between tradition and transition.

Crisp, who became director in 2007, works from a spacechallenged office suite on the sixth floor of a downtown high-rise reserved for nonprofit agencies. Her "amazingly committed staff" stays busy as a partner on a myriad of projects, including one involving Harkers Island, a fishing community that has been threatened by development and pollution. A photographer named Larry Earley had been taking pictures of the Core Sound workboats, and he realized there was an opportunity to record more than images. Working with scholars, the local people had a chance to explore and document how "people are part of the history of their place." says Crisp.

A documentary project has delved into the history of the Beacon Blanket Mill in Swannanoa. once the largest blanket factory in the world. "When it shut down, the community life as the textile workers knew it shut down," says Crisp. The North Carolina Road Work program, a new undertaking, has participants discover the stories about a road in their community and offers the possibility of moving from the personal story to larger themes. The "road" that Elizabethtown chose was the Cape Fear River. Eighty-eight-year-old Horace Butler, who still works in timber, was the last logger to take a log raft down the river in 1 957. He is the repository of a life intimately linked to the river. His story is now posted on the Bladen County Library's website. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

In Focus: North Carolina's Shelley Crisp
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.