The California School Psychologist Brings Science to Practice: University and School Collaborations to Promote Student Success

By Jimerson, Shane R. | The California School Psychologist, January 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

The California School Psychologist Brings Science to Practice: University and School Collaborations to Promote Student Success


Jimerson, Shane R., The California School Psychologist


This volume of The California School Psychologist is the last this decade that I will be responsible for in my service as Editor. Thus, prior to a synthesis of articles included in the current volume, it is essential to provide appreciation, commendation, and reflection on the recent volumes of The California School Psychologist. In addition, I will provide a brief summary of the history of The California School Psychologist.

Accolades to All Who Have Contributed

First and foremost it is essential to recognize and applaud those with whom I collaborated as editor, in particular those who have served as associate editors (Michael Furlong, Brent Duncan, Stephen Brock, and Kristin Powers), and co-editor (Marilyn Wilson, 2000) during the past decade, as their collective efforts have contributed to the quality of the articles published in The California School Psychologist. In addition, we are indebted to the many school psychologists (i.e., faculty, practitioners, and students) who have served on the Editorial Board and Student Editorial Panel during the past decade, as it is their reviews that inform necessary revisions and contribute to the quality of and editorial dispositions regarding each manuscript (each Editorial Board and Student Editorial Panel member is listed on the inside cover of each volume). The faculty and students at the University of California, Santa Barbara are to be commended for their incredibly generous support and contributions to The California School Psychologist, sustaining and enhancing the high quality of the journal through substantive as well as layout production during most of the past decade. Finally, sincere gratitude is expressed for the copyediting and recent formatting completed within the California Association of School Psychologists office, most notably Heidi Holmblad for ensuring the high quality of the publication.

A Brief History of The California School Psychologist

The California School Psychologist is an invaluable resource for faculty, students, and practitioners in school psychology across the state of California. For faculty, it represents an important venue for disseminating scholarship. For practitioners and students, the journal provides relevant, peer-reviewed information, bringing science to practice and thus contributing to continuing professional development to school psychologists across the state, as well as those who access the contents across the country and around the world, and emphasizing evidence-based prevention and interventions strategies to enhance student outcomes.

The California School Psychologist was established by the California Association of School Psychologists (CASP) 1996 as a member service. The production and layout was completed at the University of California, Santa Barbara up until the 2008 volume, when the CASP office embraced these responsibilities.

Leadership for the first three volumes of The California School Psychologist (1996, 1997, and 1998) was provided by Dr. Pauline Mercado, with Dr. Mike Furlong contributing as the associate editor. Dr. Marilyn Wilson served as editor in 1999 and 2000, with Dr. Shane Jimerson joining her as co-editor in 2000. In 2001, Dr. Jimerson continued as the editor, with Drs. Mike Furlong and Brent Duncan contributing as associate editors. In 2003, Drs. Stephen Brock and Kristin Powers joined as associated editors along with Dr. Furlong until 2007, with Drs. Jimerson (editor), Brock and Powers (associate editors) continuing through 2009. As of 2010 Dr. Michael Hass will provide leadership with Drs. Kelly Graydon and Brian Leung serving as associate editors. It has been both an honor and a privilege to collaborate with colleagues and students to contribute to The California School Psychologist.

Since its inception, efforts have been made on an on-going basis to improve the quality and contributions of The California School Psychologist. Progress toward these objectives during the past decade includes: 1) refined and further enhanced the editorial board infrastructure, including the addition of a student editorial panel; 2) prepared, submitted, negotiated, and successfully included in PsycINFO database; 3) prepared, submitted, negotiated, and successfully included in ERIC database; 4) funding provided by a grant secured by the UCSB Center for School-Based Youth Development to further enhance the content, including added pages; 5) prepared a series of special topic sections (e. …

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