KNOW YOUR CODE OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS: The Pledge

By York, Carl D. | Journal of Property Management, March/April 2010 | Go to article overview

KNOW YOUR CODE OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS: The Pledge


York, Carl D., Journal of Property Management


I pledge myself... the first three words of all five paragraphs that make up the Pledge of our IREM Code of Professional Ethics. These five paragraphs are the foundation of our Code of Professional Ethics. A pledge is a vow; a binding promise or agreement that we all agree to make in our everyday dealings with others.

The legal definition of the word pledge in Webster's New World law Dictionary is: "An item of property given as security for a debt or performance."

As IREM Candidates and Members, when we deal with others, the property we give as security is our reputation.

When we speak of ethics, we generally use or think of the concept as a measure of conduct; the conduct we expect from those we deal with and the conduct that others expect from us in return. Each of us makes our own decision about our conduct in relation to every personal and professional situation we encounter.

Charges of violation of the Code heard and decided by the Board of Ethical Inquiry and the Hearing and Discipline Board in recent years include complaints such as: giving false information about IREM membership, plagiarizing material submitted in a management plan, changing the wording of legal documents without permission, falsifying expenses submitted on an expense report, making false claims about academic accomplishment, accounting of funds outside of contract requirements... you get the picture. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

KNOW YOUR CODE OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS: The Pledge
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.