Overnight Sensation

By Harrington, Louise | British Journal of Canadian Studies, May 2004 | Go to article overview

Overnight Sensation


Harrington, Louise, British Journal of Canadian Studies


Colleen Curran, Overnight Sensation (Fredericton, NB: Goose Lane Editions, 2000), 271pp. Paper. $19.95. ISBN: 0-8649-2292-2.

Overnight Sensation is playwright and novelist Colleen Curran's second book, a sequel to Something Drastic. Set in Montreal, it is the story of Lenore Rutland, singing waitress and amateur musical comedy star, and her assorted friends and neighbours, including feminist academic Heidi, imprisoned murderess Reine, canine film-stars Brioche and Montcalm, and various duplicitous Americans, one of whom is revealed to be particularly vicious when she calls Margaret Atwood overrated (p. 181). It is narrated by the nice, naive, good-natured heroine; in fact, Lenore seems to be the only sane and non-neurotic character in novel (and that includes the dogs). Overnight Sensation has no real story as such; rather, it is a series of set pieces and amusing vignettes. The fact that Curran is primarily a playwright is demonstrated in the witty turns of phrase and the good one-liners she employs: at one point, Lenore muses that it is 'Very Canadian, thanking someone for taking me to a murder site against my better judgement' (p. …

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