How Do Novice Art Teachers Define and Implement Meaningful Curriculum?

By Bain, Christina; Newton, Connie et al. | Studies in Art Education, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

How Do Novice Art Teachers Define and Implement Meaningful Curriculum?


Bain, Christina, Newton, Connie, Kuster, Deborah, Milbrandt, Melody, Studies in Art Education


Four researchers collaborated on this qualitative case study that examined 11 first-year novice art teachers' understanding and implementation of meaningful curriculum. Participants were selected through a criterion method sampling strategy; the subjects were employed in rural, urban, and suburban public school districts. In order to conduct a cross-site analysis of the results of the study, researchers conducted three to four structured interviews during the academic year. Results indicate that the novice teachers' definitions and implementation of meaningful curriculum emphasized connecting art lessons to students' lives and culture. Novice teachers were concerned about the quality of artwork their students produced and were committed to building trust with their students.

The process of teacher education is complex and daunting as universities grapple with the task of preparing teachers during a time of increasing national and state level demands influenced by numerous mandates and reform movements (Brewer, 2006). One of the many competency requirements for future art teachers is designing and implementing curriculum (Galbraith, 1997). Wiggins and Melighe (2005) contend that effective curricula must be designed for understanding; while knowledge teaches us facts, understanding goes deeper in discovering the meaning of the facts.

In the field of curriculum, Paulo Freire (1970) emphasized the connection between critical education and social change in which learners must actively make connections between their world and what is learned. Freire described several characteristics of meaningful thematlcs: they are driven by human expression, aspirations, and their relations with the world; these human aspirations "do not exist out there somewhere as static entities; they are occurring" (p 107); thematic investigation is striving towards awareness of reality and towards self-awareness; to investigate a theme is to investigate people's thinking about reality and their reaction to reality, aspirations, motives, and objectives that are human in nature; and finally, that the process should include a concern for links between themes. Henry Glroux(1983) underscored that curriculum Is not merely the acquisition of skills, but rather the focus is on issues of power and values that matter to members of a global community.

Certainly within this scaffolding, postmodernism has exerted considerable influence on the curriculum: social and cultural theory about identity and the relationship between power and knowledge, art as cultural production, multiculturalism, and temporal and special flux (Efland, Freedman, & Stuhr, 1996). For more than two decades, curriculum approaches have reflected a postmodern shift in art education to move away from a particular curriculum theory to a plurality of approaches that are more student-centered in a social context (Ballengee-Morris & Stuhr, 2001; Banks, 1993; Campbell, 2005; Clark, 1996; Dunn, 1995; Efland, 2004; Garber, 2004; Guay, 1994; Guilfoll & Sandler, 1999; Jones, 1997; Saunders, 1998). Likewise, in the field of art education, Anderson and Milbrandt (2005) and Walker (2001) explained how meaning could be developed through thematic inquiry. Stewart and Walker (2005) looked at the curriculum in context and offered a multitude of examples of big and enduring ideas as organizers of curricular units. Likewise, Taylor, Carpenter, Ballengee-Morris, and Sessions (2006) examined interdisciplinary approaches to artmaking, including integrating visual culture as well as forging connections to local and global communities through servicelearning. Gaudelius and Speirs (2002) discussed how a variety of perspectives ranging from feminism to popular culture serve to frame issue based art curricula. Gude (2007) drew upon issues within her local community in creating curriculum for the Spiral Workshop at the University of Illinois. On the other hand, Bolin, Blandy, and Congdon (2000) considered how stories that focus on underrepresented or little known people and cultures could shape artmaking as well as curricular choices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Do Novice Art Teachers Define and Implement Meaningful Curriculum?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.