Comparison of Stimdate with Ritalin in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

By Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin et al. | Iranian Journal of Psychiatry, Winter 2009 | Go to article overview

Comparison of Stimdate with Ritalin in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial


Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza, Akhondzadeh, Shahin, Mehr, Najmeh Khosrovan, Mohammadi, Mohammad, Mahintorabi, Somayeh, Iranian Journal of Psychiatry


Objectives: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to assess the efficacy of stimdate compared to ritalin in the treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Method: Sixty four subjects (45 boys and 15 girls) aged 5-13 who were diagnosed with ADHD based on (DSM-IV-TR) criteria were selected for this study. The subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: one group with 30 subjects received stimdate and the other group of 30 subjects received ritalin for 6 weeks. Treatment outcomes were assessed using the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Rating Scale administered at baseline and on weeks 2, 4 and 6 following the treatment. A two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (time- treatment interaction) was used.

Results: There were no significant differences between sex, age, weight, and ethnicity of the participants in the 2 groups. Both groups showed a significant improvement during the 6 weeks of the treatment period, and this improvement was due to the parents' ADHD Rating Scale during the treatment.

Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, no significant difference was observed between the two medications, and it seems both drugs behave in a similar way. In addition, stimdate appears to be effective and well tolerated for ADHD in children and adolescents in Iran.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity, Children, Generic drugs, Methylphenidate

Iran J Psychiatry 2008; 4:31-35

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. The incidence of ADHD is 5-10% in children and the symptoms are known to persist into adulthood in 10-60% of the cases (1). The etiology of ADHD is not understood, yet potent drugs are being employed for its medical management while safe and effective alternatives are being neglected. Neurochemical studies suggest alterations in catecholaminergic-mainly dopaminergic and noradrenergic-transmitter functions markedly contribute to the symptoms of ADHD. The ADHD symptoms are significantly ameliorated by agents that specifically influence these neurotransmitter systems; animal studies implicate those areas of the brain where these neurotransmitters are most dominant.Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common neurobehavioral disorder of childhood. The incidence of ADHD is 5-10% in children and the symptoms are known to persist into adulthood in 10-60% of the cases (1). The etiology of ADHD is not understood, yet potent drugs are being employed for its medical management while safe and effective alternatives are being neglected. Neurochemical studies suggest alterations in catecholaminergic-mainly dopaminergic and noradrenergic-transmitter functions markedly contribute to the symptoms of ADHD. The ADHD symptoms are significantly ameliorated by agents that specifically influence these neurotransmitter systems; animal studies implicate those areas of the brain where these neurotransmitters are most dominant.

In conjunction with psychosocial interventions such as parent training, contingency management, and social skills training, stimulant pharmacotherapy has been used for the treatment of ADHD for many decades in (2, 3).

Although stimulants are highly effective in controlling the symptoms of ADHD, some children will not respond to, or do not tolerate them. Thus, the desire for safe and effective non-stimulant medications has risen during the past several years (4-10).

In Iran, ADHD signs and symptoms are regarded as being ordinary in some families, especially when boys are concerned. Furthermore, pharmacotherapy for ADHD children is regarded unfavorably by parents (6). Greenhill study showed that release methylphenidate (MPH), administered once daily in the morning is effective and safe in controlling ADHD symptoms throughout the day (11). Children suffering from ADHD respond differentially to treatment with ritalin (12). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Comparison of Stimdate with Ritalin in Children and Adolescents with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Double-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.