Barghouti and BDS Movement Fight Racial Injustice

By Hanley, Delinda C. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, May/June 2010 | Go to article overview

Barghouti and BDS Movement Fight Racial Injustice


Hanley, Delinda C., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


OMAR Barghouti, a founding member of the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI), spoke at the 14th Street Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC on March 2, during Israeli Apartheid Week. Busboys owner Andy Shallal welcomed the capacity audience, and Head-Roc warmed up the crowd with rap songs from his album "Negrophobia!" Black Voices for Peace and U.S. Campaign to End the Occupation member Felicia Eaves introduced Barghouti, who gave a superb talk about the growth of the Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) campaign and its connection to movements for social and racial justice in the United States.

"I am humbled to speak about injustice in the land of injustice," the Palestinian activist began. "Your 'not just' government is the main supporter of our oppressors." Barghouti asked if providing $3 to $6 billion a year to Israel is serving U.S. interests, or if that money could be put to better use at home.

"You had apartheid in the United States longer than they had it in South Africa-they just gave it a new name," he pointed out.

Barghouti compared the Israeli occupation with the colonization, death and destruction of Africa. Both colonizers used the biggest weapon, "the cultural bomb," which annihilates belief in one's native language and heritage. It creates a wasteland of non-achievement, despair, despondency and a collective death wish. This oppression tries to "crush our identity and hope," Barghouti charged. During its establishment Israel committed a "cultural massacre," destroying tens of thousands of Palestinian books in an effort to "Judaize" the new nation.

Israel preaches freedom and practices slavery, Barghouti warned. The Israel Defense Force is the country's melting pot, and as such is reflective of larger Israeli society. In the army Israeli youth undergo a "radicalization process" where they're taught that Palestinians are not persons with human rights. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Barghouti and BDS Movement Fight Racial Injustice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.