Anger Management and the Process Mediating the Link between Witnessing Violence between Parents and Partner Violence

By Turcotte-Seabury, Catherine A. | Violence and Victims, May 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

Anger Management and the Process Mediating the Link between Witnessing Violence between Parents and Partner Violence


Turcotte-Seabury, Catherine A., Violence and Victims


Multinomial logistic regression was used on a sample of 14,252 students to determine the extent to which the relationship between witnessing interparental violence and the perpetration of violence is mediated by limited anger management ability, and to determine whether anger management is a mediator for women as well as men. Both males and females who witnessed interparental violence had higher levels of violence perpetration, and those who disclosed witnessing interparental violence had more limited anger management abilites. These limited anger management abilities were associated with increased levels of violence perpetration. This study is consistent with others finding a relationship between witnessing interparental violence and the perpetration of violence but also shows that the relationship between these two variables is mediated by limited anger management abilities.

Keywords : Conflict Tactics Scales ; intergenerational transmission ; abuse ; aggression ; domestic violence

It is well established that children who witness interparental violence have higher levels of aggression ( Bevan & Higgins, 2002 ; Forsstrom-Cohen & Rosenbaum, 1985 ; Heyman & Smith-Slep, 2002 ; Kalmuss, 1984 ; O'Keefe, 1998 ; Wolf & Foshee, 2003 ), including subsequent involvement in violent relationships as a vicitm or perpetrator ( Stith, Rosen, & Middleton, 2000 ). Kalmuss (1984) also found that observed interparental aggression has a stronger relationship with the subsequent perpetration of violence than does physical abuse from parents.

Although research has determined that there is a degree of "intergenerational transfer" of violent behavior from parent to child, it has not provided much information on the possible mediating or intervening variables that act to increase the chances that a child who has seen his or her parents engage in physical acts of violence will later become a perpetrator of relationship violence. Anger management ability is one such possible mediating variable and is sometimes a component of treatment programs for violence offenders. By identifying factors that mediate the relationship between witnessing violence and the subsequent perpetration of violence, the nature of the association between witnessing and perpetrating violence will be better understood.

A number of mediating variables have previously been investigated, such as selfesteem ( O'Keefe, 1998 ), liberal or conservative views toward women ( Alexander, Moore, & Alexander, 1991 ; Lichter & McCloskey, 2004 ), and acceptance of family violence ( Markowitz, 2001 ). If anger management is found to be an additional mediating factor, it would aid in more fully explaining the association between interparental violence and the subsequent perpetration of violence, as well as address issues surrounding the treatment of perpetrators of violence. A significant relationship between limited anger management and the perpetration of violence would strengthen the case for anger management as a component of treatment for aggressors of family violence.

Prior work has long suggested that anger and skill deficits in areas such as assertiveness may play critical roles in the perpetration of domestic violence ( Maiuro, Cahn, & Vitaliano, 1987 ; Maiuro, Cahn, Vitaliano, Wagner, & Zegree, 1988 ). However, there appears to be only one study examining anger control as a developmental and mediating variable, and it did so by examining "anger expression styles" rather than anger management ability ( Wolf & Foshee, 2003 ).

Limited anger management ability can manifest itself as low self-control and impulsive behavior. Lack of self-control and impulsivity have long been associated with criminal behavior ( Davey, Day, & Howells, 2005 ; Gottfredson & Hirschi, 1990 ). If witnessing violence between parents leads to low anger mangement ability, we can expect this to be associated with physically assaulting a partner. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Anger Management and the Process Mediating the Link between Witnessing Violence between Parents and Partner Violence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.