Eastfield Village Summer Workshops Focus on Dutch Houses, American Parlors, and Stoneware in America

The Chronicle of the Early American Industries Association, Inc., May/June 2010 | Go to article overview

Eastfield Village Summer Workshops Focus on Dutch Houses, American Parlors, and Stoneware in America


Historic Eastfield Foundation will hold its 23rd Annual Series of early American trades and historic preservation workshops, beginning in early June and continuing through the summer at Eastfield Village in Nassau, New York. Eastfield Village is an authentic nineteenth-century early American village in upstate New York. The workshops include tinsmithing with Bill McMillen, caring for traditional tools with Robert Adam, and making rush seats with Bob Shields.

This year Eastfield will feature three in-depth seminars: stoneware in America, a look at the parlor in American domestic life, and the Dutch house in America. "Stonewares in Use in America 16201 850" will concentrate on the evidence of use and manufacture of a broad range of stoneware in early America. The seminar will examine all of these wares and discuss how they fit into the fabric of young America. A large collection of white English stoneware will be on display for the meeting. Participants are encouraged to bring shards and pots for display during the program.

"A Peek Into The Parlor 1780" is a three-day historical look at where Americans spent their social time. It will focus on architecture, lighting, heating, eating, furnishings and drapery in the period from 1780 to 1860. Post-revolutionary parlors in America filled more than a single function. The parlor provided a space for eating, entertainment, sleeping, and laying out one's dead. Tables and chairs were moved to accommodate these many uses. By the 1 840s, room specialization became a more important part of how the middle class saw its use of living space. The development of industrial processes combined with a growing middle class increased the number of people with leisure time who wanted to make use of and show off their parlors. Homes, even in rural areas, were built with rooms specifically designed as parlors. The relationship of parlors with surrounding rooms was an important component in the evolution of their design and use. …

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