Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices

By Allen, Kathleen P. | The Professional Educator, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices


Allen, Kathleen P., The Professional Educator


Abstract

While bullying in schools has begun to receive attention, little is known about the relationship between classroom management and bullying in the classroom. The process for exploring this relationship will be a review of research and literature related to bullying in the school environment, classroom management, teacher practices, and student behavior. Research from a number of fields suggests that several variables conspire to create environments where bullying is more likely to occur. These include harsh and punitive discipline methods, lower-quality classroom instruction, disorganized classroom and school settings, and student social structures characterized by antisocial behaviors. Future directions indicate a need for preservice and in-service education on classroom management practices and student bullying. Additionally, future research should consider an investigation of the relationship between classroom management practices and student bullying, as well as further exploration of teacher bullying of students and student bullying of teachers.

Introduction

Teaching can be a daunting endeavor-for both experts and novice teachers. It is a profession that requires the ability to be responsive to new demands and changing needs. In recent years, school reform promoting high-stakes testing in the name of improving academic achievement has dominated the list of problems demanding consideration. However, there are other problems that also demand attention-for example, bullying.

Although not a new problem, attention to bullying was limited until the events at Columbine High School in April, 1999. In recent years, research has implicated teasing, harassment, and bullying in a number of the targeted school shootings that have taken place in the United States (Vossekuil, Fein, Reddy, Borum, & Modzeleski, 2002). Data indicate that bullying is embedded in a larger problem of school violence.

There is another perhaps related issue that has received less attention but is nevertheless a concern for educators: classroom management. Research over the past few decades has consistently indicated that new teachers feel unprepared when it comes to classroom management skills (Duck, 2007; Freiberg, 2002; Meister & Melnick, 2003; Merrett & Wheldall, 1993; Stoughton, 2007) and that they are often unprepared to function successfully in today's classrooms with regard to managing administrative tasks, curriculum, and behavior problems (Allen & Blackston, 2003; Bauman & Del Rio, 2006; Kirkpatrick, Lincoln, & Morrow, 2006; Public Agenda, 2004; Thompson & Walter, 1998). Additionally, it is a well-established fact that student misbehavior is a factor in teacher burnout and the decision of novice teachers to leave the profession (Public Agenda, 2004). It seems that the need for successful classroom management skills has not diminished during a time when school reform has put the spotlight on academic testing and student achievement.

Thus, it is important to ask the following questions: What is the nature of bullying in the classroom? How is it manifested? Is there a connection between school bullying in the classroom and classroom management? If so, what is it? Would it be beneficial to consider these two issues together? How do teachers learn classroom management skills? How do they learn about bullying? When and where does learning about these two issues intersect? Through a review of research literature related to bullying in the school environment, the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between classroom bullying, classroom management, and teacher practices.

Theoretical Framework

This review of research approaches the issues of classroom management, bullying in the classroom, and teacher practices from a social-ecological perspective. Swearer and Espelage (2004) note that Bronfenbrenner (1979) described ecological-systems theory as purporting that "all individuals are part of interrelated systems that locate the individual at the center and move out from the center to include all systems that affect the individual" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Classroom Management, Bullying, and Teacher Practices
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.