Music

By Young, Jon | Mother Jones, July/August 2010 | Go to article overview

Music


Young, Jon, Mother Jones


TRACK 6

"Brightest Minds"

from Department of Eagles' Archive 2003-2006

AMERICAN DUST

Liner notes: Ethereal grace and toe-tapping energy intertwine on this anxious rocker.

Behind the music: nyu roommates Daniel Rossen and Fred Nico laus launched their musical partnership in the early OOs. Though Rossen later joined the similar-sounding (and better-known) Grizzly Bear, they've continued to collaborate.

Check itout if you like: Wistful deceased folkies Elliott Smith and Nick Drake, Brian Wilson collaborator Van Dyke Parks, and similar head-in-theclouds types.

TRACK 4

"Summer Dust"

from the Love Language's Libraries

MERGE

Liner notes: "Our hearts were beating like hummingbirds that night," sighs Stuart McLamb on this epic Morrissey-meets-Phil-Spector ballad.

Behind the music: North Carolina native McLamb launched the Love Language as a oneman studio project in the wake of romantic desperation and alcoholic excess. With its swooning melodies and soaring arrangements, this sophomore album is more polished than his debut, but just as charming.

Check itout if you like: Stylish rock-and-roll crooners in the tradition of Roy Orbison and Bryan Ferry.

TRACK 3

"18 Hours (Of Love)"

from K-X-P's K-X-P

SMALLTOWN SUPERSOUND

Liner notes: A raucous drumsbass-synthesizer trio from Helsinki, K-X-P stages a thrilling collision of dance, trance, and rockabilly on the most accessible track from its intriguing debut. …

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