Going Green: The Impact on Higher Education Institutions

By Santos, Annette Taijeron | Journal of International Business Research, July 1, 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Going Green: The Impact on Higher Education Institutions


Santos, Annette Taijeron, Journal of International Business Research


ABSTRACT

Campus greening poses potent challenges to higher education institutions to take an in-terest in decreasing its carbon footprint. To what extent does going green affect the strategic positioning of higher education institutions and how might campuses begin the process? If higher education institutions are able to stake out a competitive advantage through green initiatives, can the institution's operations sustain it? This article will explore a number of performance models to gauge best practices in higher education, particularly campuses pursuing a green business strategy. Furthermore, this article seeks ways higher education institutions may effectively bridge internal and external activities as well as assess current strategies in pursuit of a new trajectory towards building sustainable value.

INTRODUCTION

Across higher education, campuses are littered with utterances of green, eco-friendly, climate neutral, eco-chic lingos. The eco-lingo is a result of green trends overtaking campuses around the nation and the globe. In October 2006, presidents and chancellors of American col-leges and universities laid the groundwork for the President's Climate Commitment. This framework provided the structure and support for America's colleges and universities to go cli-mate neutral. The ultimate goal is to generate a broad, continuous, higher education effort on climate change with at least 1,000 participating institutions by December 2009. As of January 29, 2009, the American Association of College and University Presidents website showed a total of 607 signatories, a little over half of their target membership. The increasing number of universities and colleges yielding to the growing pressures to "go green" pauses one to question how universities and colleges are "greening" their institutions and what best practices exist to make this endeavor a sustainable one. In reviewing the activities of universities and colleges on various green lists as well as institutions with membership in various green groups, there is evidence of campus greening in regards to facilities and dorms, recycling and energy conservation, changes to the curriculum, yet much more attention must be paid to whether such green practices can be sustained and do such practices yield a competitive advantage.

This article develops a strategic perspective in regards to the pursuit of sustainable value by first exploring existing strategic models ofperformance, then identifying some potential chal-lenges associated with pursuing green initiatives in higher education, and finally proposing a model ofperformance to evaluate the organization's strategies and its capacity to transform the stated challenges into initiatives to increase shareholder value for the next generation of eco-chic students and other members of a campus community.

Strategic performance models were developed for managing organizational performance. There are a number of performance models that have been developed to assist organizations in achieving optimal performance. Across the board, performance models consist of activities such as developing goals, monitoring progress toward goal attainment, feedback activities to enhance continuous improvement or determine the need for adjustment of goals and performance objec-tives. Performance management systems are closely associated with determining compensation but its more effective use is as a system of accountability and a driver of organizational change (Howard, 1994). In reviewing the different models discussed in the strategic management litera-ture review, the models to be explored in this article were narrowed down to systems alignment (Labovitz and Rosansky, 1997; Howard, 1994), dashboard performance reporting (Kaplan and Norton, 1992; Hart and Milstein, 2003), and business process reengineering (Hammer and Champy, 1993). These models were selected based on their relevance to organizational change as well as its focus on organizational alignment to gauge performance.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Going Green: The Impact on Higher Education Institutions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.