Fidelity, Persistence, and Best Practice

By Peck, Alec; Scarpati, Stan | Teaching Exceptional Children, July/August 2010 | Go to article overview

Fidelity, Persistence, and Best Practice


Peck, Alec, Scarpati, Stan, Teaching Exceptional Children


We have had the privilege of editing TEACHING Exceptional Children (TEC) for almost 10 years and have learned much from reading manuscripts and meetings with authors. Simultaneously, we have been teaching in our respective universities and have been talking with students about their use of some of the practical methods described in the journal. From these perspectives as editors and teachers/ learners, we have recognized the importance of the confluence of three critical issues: fidelity, persistence, and best practice. In many ways, these tenets structured how we evaluated manuscripts and how we organized the presentation of information so that the TEC readership could effect positive change for exceptional children in classrooms.

Special education practice continues to unfold in ways that point to more attention to outcomes-based interventions and methods that fully engage the general education curriculum. Special educators are stewards of a vast and tested applied research repository that must not go unrecognized, should be valued for what it can demonstrate, and should be utilized in new and innovative ways to meet classroom demands. We've seen a renewed interest in evidence-based practice - but we have also witnessed how this term is sufficiently malleable: much of what is portrayed as practice built on solid support falls far from the mark of what is generally agreed upon as substantive and valid research. Given that reality, and that classrooms are not laboratories, we anchored our selection of research articles at the intersection of what we hoped to see in each article: some representation of how the technique presented maintained a level of fidelity, persistence, and best practice.

For us, fidelity refers to faithfully carrying out the teaching techniques described in these articles. In our university roles, we have encountered situations in which our students have partially duplicated techniques or have used what they thought were similar or equivalent procedures only to discover that their variance from the strategy described in an article defeated the technique. Similarly, as editors, we looked for ways that researchers approached intervention with attention to maintaining reliability, giving us a sense that we could trust what had occurred and that results were dependable and replicable.

We use the term persistence to refer to allowing sufficient time for a strategy to work. Some students have attempted to replicate a strategy for a brief period of time before giving up, not realizing that if they had simply persisted in administering the treatment they would have accomplished their goals.

Finally, best practice refers to classroom teaching and management techniques which have been shown to accomplish specific goals in an efficient and effective manner. We have tried to make TEC a showcase for best practice. Indeed, the vast majority of articles we have published are descriptions of classroom practice that has been shown to be effective with exceptional children in various settings.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Fidelity, Persistence, and Best Practice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.