Anglo-Saxon Myths: State and Church, 400-1066

By Nelson, Janet L. | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2002 | Go to article overview

Anglo-Saxon Myths: State and Church, 400-1066


Nelson, Janet L., The Catholic Historical Review


Anglo-Saxon Myths: State and Church, 400-1066. By Nicholas Brooks. (Rio Grande, Ohio: Hambledon Press. 2000. Pp. xvi, 308. $70.00.)

Nicholas Brooks is a master-craftsman of Anglo-Saxon history, and this second volume of his published papers (following Communications and Warfare, also in 2000), like a Shaker chair, enthuses for beauty and utility alike. The collection begins with a wise, and wide-ranging, inaugural lecture delivered at the University of Birmingham in 1986, and a model of the genre, exploring the paradox of forgeries as historical sources. It ends with a study (originally published in 1988) applying multidisciplinary resources to map big questions of change, natural and man-made, onto the local landscape of Romney Marsh in the county of Kent. For both chapters, crucial evidence is supplied by charters, some more or less forged. In between are ten papers, loosely linked by the idea of myths, legends, and forgeries as tales told which can also be truth-telling. After an evocatively-introductory chapter 2 come a pair of studies of Kent and Mercia in the early Anglo-Saxon period (first published in 1989), the latter propounding the explosive, and seductive, argument that the Tribal Hidage represents a Northumbrian humiliation of Mercia at some point (three options are indicated) in the seventh century, and both highlighting the contributions of wealth and ideology to the formation of early kingdoms. Next, and aptly, comes the one previously unpublished paper in the volume,"The English Origin Myth" (chapter 5). Brooks argues persuasively that the Historia Brittonum preserves legends-useful fictions-taken up in ninth-century Gwynedd but originating as the stuff from which an elite's consciousness of collective identity was forged in AEthelbert's Kent.

And so to Canterbury, whose Anglo-Saxon history, and extraordinary archive, Brooks has done more than anyone to explore. Chapter 6 discusses the evidence, written and material, for its ecclesiastical topography. At the heart of this collection, chapter 7, "The Cathedral Community at Canterbury, 597-1070" (originally published in 1995), constitutes an "updated summary" of much of Brooks's major book of 1984. Yet Brooks's 1984 hypothesis that Alfred spotted a window of opportunity opened by Vikings to seize the lands of Kentish ministers seems to have been discarded-regrettably, since it's preferable to 1995's contention that "in an age of Viking attacks, it was more than usually apparent that the interests of church and state coincided"(p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Anglo-Saxon Myths: State and Church, 400-1066
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.