Committees-The Beating Heart of AJS

By Vallianos, Carole Wagner | Judicature, May/June 2010 | Go to article overview

Committees-The Beating Heart of AJS


Vallianos, Carole Wagner, Judicature


The American Judicature Society has been important in the administration of justice for almost 100 years. Each of us has contributed in some way to its rieh history and, as members of the public and as members of AJS, we have received the benefits of its work.

Your participation is vital in many ways. You have contributed financially through your dues and special donations. You have contributed scholarly árdeles and commentary. You have served in leadership positions on the board of directors or the National Advisory Council or in your state chapters. You have given of yourselves in many ways. And, since its earliest days, you have been members of broadly-based committees that generate substantive contributions to our mission and ensure proper governance, structure, and administration of AJS.

The following committees are at the heart of our organization:

The Amicus Committee considers requests for AJS to file amicus briefs in cases relevant to our mission, goals, and expertise- Most recently, AJS submitted a strong amicus brief, drafted by pro bono counsel at O'Melveny & Meyers in Los Angeles, defending Alaska's judicial merit selection system.

The Awards Committee considers nominations for the Kathleen M. Sampson Access to Justice Award, the state-based Herbert Harley Award, and the Special Merit Citation, and provides guidance on other AJS awards.

The Center for Judicial Ethics Advisory Committee provides guidance on judicial conduct issues, considers requests for co-sponsorship of judicial ethics proposals, and helps plan the National College on Judicial Conduct and Ethics.

The Corporate and Law Firm Benefactor Development Committee secures new sources of annual financial support critical to underwriting our journal, Judicature, and funding a broad range of other programs. …

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