Report and Recommendations Issued in "Kids for Cash" Scandal

By Gray, Cynthia | Judicature, May/June 2010 | Go to article overview

Report and Recommendations Issued in "Kids for Cash" Scandal


Gray, Cynthia, Judicature


On May 27, 2010, the Pennsylvania Interbranch Commission on Juvenile Justice released a report with over 40 recommendations. The impetus for the Commission was the so-called "Kids for Cash" scandal first revealed in January 2009, when the U.S. Attorney filed a criminal information charging Luzerne County President Judge Mark Ciavarella and his predecessor Judge Michael Conahan with taking over $2.5 million in payoffs between June 2000 and January 2007 for helping a private juvenile detention center earn millions from county contracts.

The Interbranch Commission had 1 1 members, four appointed by the Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, three by the governor, and four by leaders of the House and Senate. It held 1 1 days of public hearings between October 2009 and August 2010 and took testimony from more than 60 witnesses. The Commission concluded that there was "essentially . . . a collapse of the rule of law" in the Luzerne County juvenile court.

In 2002, Conahan, in his capacity as president judge, had signed a placement guara ? tee agree ment with PA Child Care, a for-profit juvenile detention facility, and took official action to remove funding from the county court budget for die county-run juvenile detention facility. In January, 2003, Conahan and Ciavarella received their first payment from the owner and building of the private facility- a $997,000 "broker's fee."

Even before 2002, however, beginning when he first became juvenile judge in 1996, Ciavarella had adopted a zero tolerance policy toward juvenile crime in the schools (which met with the approval of school authorities and the community) and routinely failed to properly effectuate juveniles' right to counsel, resulting in a disproportionately high detention rate compared to the rest of the state. This "penchant for confinement arguably created the opportunity for profit," the Commission found, "but it is clear that the opportunity for profit did not create the penchant for confinement."

Emphasizing that Ciavarella's practices were not secret, the Commission found that "the Luzerne County juvenile justice scandal cannot be understood as simply the isolated acts of former judges Conahan and Ciavarella." The Commission concluded there was "a breakdown by all three branches of government, at both the county and state level, in meeting their shared and independent responsibilities."

Whether because of intimidation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Report and Recommendations Issued in "Kids for Cash" Scandal
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.