Irr Soldiers Muster in Puerto Rico

By Kappmeyer, Brian | Warrior - Citizen, Summer 2010 | Go to article overview

Irr Soldiers Muster in Puerto Rico


Kappmeyer, Brian, Warrior - Citizen


FORT BUCHANAN, Puerto Rico - In 2007, Spc. Juan J. Pérez completed a 16-month mobilization, including a one-year tour in Iraq, with the Puerto Rico National Guard. He figured he should say goodbye to his wife and three kids again when the Army Human Resources Command invited him to attend an Individual Ready Reserve muster.

Bue after signing in, Pérez quickly realized he was not being mobilized for another combat tour. Instead, he and other IRR Soldiers spent the day updating their records and learning about their benefits and entitlements, including promotion, schooling, health care and civilian job opportunities.

"One of our biggest challenges is ensuring that Soldiers understand this is a muster, not a mobilization," said Lt. Col. Craig Smith, HRC's muster team chief. "We do not mobilize Soldiers at musters. We are here to ensure Soldiers are getting registered tor the benefits they have earned. The Department of Veterans Affairs, the Army and service organizations have more to ofïer than most Soldiers can even begin to realize."

In fact, 17 veteran support agencies attended the Puerto Rico muster to talk about their services and tell Soldiers about opportunities that could benefit them and their Families. Musters have come to resemble career and education fairs with "vendor" booths set up between the muster stations.

"Tile muster program gives us the chance to collect required information from our IRR Soldiers, but it also gives them a chance to learn about the services and benefits available to them," Smith said. "A lot of opportunities can open up for them through either more active IRR participation, membership in a Reserve unit or volunteering to mobilize in support ot overseas contingency operations. We are giving (he IRR Soldiers the cools to make an informed decision and help them determine what works for them."

During 2010, thousands of IRR Soldiers will muster in 19 cities to complete annual readiness checks. The Puerto Rico muster represents the first to be held outside the contiguous states. It's another expansion oí a successful program that began in 2007 with just tour musters.

"The team is venturing outside the continental United States this year for the first time, because we realized it was important to offer our services to those Soldiers as well," Smith said. There are future plans for overseas musters.

A Soldier typically becomes an IRR member after successfully completing several years of active duty or Selected Reserve membership. Soldiers may transfer to the IRR to fulfill the remainder of their contractual military service obligation, normally eight years.

Mustering is an annual requirement and a one-day event tor which IRR Soldiers are paid about $200. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Irr Soldiers Muster in Puerto Rico
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.