The Correlation of Concentration of Plasma Lactates and Blood Alcohol Concentration in Patients Acutely Intoxicated by Alcohol

By Franceski, Tanja; Karlovic, Dalibor et al. | Alcoholism, January 1, 2010 | Go to article overview

The Correlation of Concentration of Plasma Lactates and Blood Alcohol Concentration in Patients Acutely Intoxicated by Alcohol


Franceski, Tanja, Karlovic, Dalibor, Kovak-Mufic, Ana, Madzarac, Vedran, Torre, Robert, Alcoholism


Summary -

The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation of concentration of plasma lactates and blood alcohol concentration in patients acutely intoxicated with alcohol. Since alcohol inhibits gluconeogenesis and lactate is its main substrate, an increase of serum lactates with a possible development of acidosis by lactic acid is expected in acutely intoxicated persons.

All the patients detoxicated at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Sestre milosrdnice, in the first five months in 2006 were included in the study. We excluded all the patients with a somatic diagnosis. The diagnosis of acute alcohol intoxication was made according to ICD-10 criteria. We analyzed consciousness as well as plasma concentrations of glucoses, urea, lactates, ethyl alcohol, AST, ALT and GGT There was a statistically significant correlation between the concentration of plasma lactates and blood alcohol concentration in patients acutely intoxicated with alcohol (Spearman's correlation = 0.537 and p = 0.01). In conclusion, the results of this study show that alcohol-intoxicated patients risk the occurrence of lactic acid, so this fact should be taken into account while monitoring actively alcohol-intoxicated patients.

Keywords: plasma lactates; blood alcohol concentration; acute alcohol intoxication

INTRODUCTION

Lactates are the final product of anaerobic glycolysis, especially in muscles, erythrocytes, intestines and brain. The formed lactate converts itself into glucose by gluconeogenesis in liver, and partly in the kidney cells.1 Ethanol inhibits the processes of gluconeogenesis in several points by decreasing the intake of glucose precursor from liver and kidneys. It directs the precursors towards other metabolic paths (it limits the entrance in the gluconeogenesis paths), directly limits gluconeogenesis enzymes, and by use of metabolic products decreases cofactors (NAD) and mitochondrion oxidative processes which help gluconeogenesis.2 Since lactate is one of the main gluconeogenesis substrates, an increase of plasma lactates with a possible occurrence of acidosis induced by lactic acid is expected to occur due to acute alcohol intoxication.

Alcohol intoxication occurs by a single intake of an alcoholic beverage, and in proportion to the quantity of the alcohol intake it leads to the consciousness level disorder, cognition disorder, perception disorder, mood disorder and other forms of behavior disorders. While a mild intoxication can cause the patient to become relaxed, talkative, and euphoric, a severe intoxication often leads to severe disorders, such as aggression, labile mood, erroneous judgment and social and working inability.3-5

The intoxicated persons show at least one of the following symptoms: irregular and incomprehensible speaking, coordination disturbances, nystagmus, memory disorder, somnolence, sopor, and coma.

Complications in acute drunkenness are head injuries (subdural, epidural and intracranial hematoma), fractures of other bone systems, inhaling the thrown up content, traffic accidents, crimogene behavior, homicides and suicides. Complications, especially changes of consciousness to which the development of lacteal acidosis can contribute, are a special problem.67

The aim of this paper was to examine the correlation of concentration of plasma lactates and blood alcohol concentration in patients acutely intoxicated with alcohol.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

The study was structured as prospective-observational and it included all the patients acutely intoxicated with alcohol detoxicated at the Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Sestre milosrdnice, in the first five months of 2006 (N = 73). All the patients with a somatic diagnosis (N = 50) were excluded from the study. The final sample consisted of 23 patients. There were 18 male and 5 female patients. The subjects' mean age was (mean ± SD; 45.9 ± 9.82) years (from a minimum of 32 to a maximum of 65 years of age). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Correlation of Concentration of Plasma Lactates and Blood Alcohol Concentration in Patients Acutely Intoxicated by Alcohol
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.