Time for Community Colleges to Lead on Diversifying Faculty

By Kayes, Pauline E.; Singley, Yvonne | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, September 3, 2010 | Go to article overview

Time for Community Colleges to Lead on Diversifying Faculty


Kayes, Pauline E., Singley, Yvonne, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


Inclusive student body requires two-year institutions to hire more multicultural faculty to address learning needs.

Community colleges like to tout the fact that so many culturally diverse and minority students are enrolled in our institutions. Something else we are proud of is our mission, so succinctly described by Dr. George Boggs, president of the American Association of Community Colleges, in a 2009 Community College Journal article: "Among America's institutions of higher education, community colleges have the greatest potential to advance true egalitarianism and to prepare the country's future educated work force."

So, given our talking points about the value of diversity in community colleges, why aren't we doing a better job of diversifying our faculty? Minority faculty hiring has not kept pace with increases in minority student enrollment at public two-year colleges. While underrepresented minorities make up 39 percent of community college student enrollment, just 16.3 percent of faculty are of color, according to 2009 Digest of Education statistics. In spite of a variety of initiatives and programs to improve diverse hiring, why has the percentage of minority faculty at these institutions remained relatively unchanged over the past 10 years?

The answer can be found in examining the cultural biases still permeating our search committees and our institutional cultures, both of which impact our ability to recruit, hire, and keep diverse faculty. Frankly, many community college cultures are still characterized by a resistance to diverse hiring at the same time our college catalogs are publicizing our diverse student demographics. As one African-American faculty member we interviewed for our video, New Paradigms for Diversijying Faculty in Higher Education, describes, "Our colleges may be interested in aesthetic diversity but are still threatened by the real change that diverse faculty represent." This resistance can be found on search committees in the form of the mistaken belief that academic degrees, achievements and reputations make search committee decisions unbiased.

In reality, though, we know that search committee deliberations are oñen rife with misperceptions, assumptions, biases, stereotypes and racism. As Dr. Caroline Turner, author of Diversifying Faculty: A Guidebook for Search Committees, points out, "An example of dysconscious racism includes the predisposition of search committees to look for and favor candidates like themselves. ... One might say that search committees, without intending to, look for Afro-Saxons or Hispanic-Saxons."

Another crucial factor in the lack of diverse faculty hiring is that search committees are still regarded in community colleges as the sacrosanct nexus of the hiring process, guarding that mythical ivory tower where those who are "let in" are always assumed to be the "most qualified" and the "best fit. …

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Time for Community Colleges to Lead on Diversifying Faculty
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