Ready Tonight, Sustain the Fight, Shape the Future!

By Webster, William G. | Army, October 2010 | Go to article overview

Ready Tonight, Sustain the Fight, Shape the Future!


Webster, William G., Army


U.S. Army Central (USARCENT), also known by its historical name, Third Army, supports all ground forces in U.S. Central Command's (USCENTCOM) 20-nation area of responsibility (AOR), an area 1.5 times the size of the continental United States. Since 1990, Third Army has maintained a continuous forward presence in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility. As USCENTCOM's Army service component command, Third Army/USARCENT supports deployed Army forces and serves as a combined /joint force land component command when directed.

A robust forward presence allows the command to improve responsiveness and readiness, sustain forces, and build partner-nation capacity to deter and counter threats in the region more effectively. Operating from headquarters in Atlanta, Ga., and Kuwait, USARCENT trains for combat; sustains combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq; supports peace and stability in the region by building relationships and partner capacity; and maintains the capability to operate as a combined forces land component command (CFLCC).

As a CFLCC-capable headquarters, USARCENT is ready to deploy anywhere in the AOR on short notice and engage in limited-duration combat operations across the full spectrum. The assault command post is frequently deployed to regional training events, exercising the command's ability to deploy to an austere environment, establish a forward command post and conduct combat operations.

Third Army/USARCENT supports coordinated sustainment efforts in combat through the ARCENT support element in Iraq and the ARCENT coordination and support element in Afghanistan. Approximately 40 percent of the headquarters staff is forward in the combat theater at any given time, with the capability to "surge" forward or redeploy as different missions require. The command also maintains shipping, storage, maintenance, refurbishment, repair, training and deployment facilities throughout the AOR in support of U.S. ground forces' operations. The USARCENT team's presence in the USCENTCOM area of responsibility numbers approximately 52,000 soldiers, Department of Defense civilians, and contractors conducting combat, logistics, training and assessment activities in 18 of USCENTCOM's 20 nations.

Ready Tonight

USARCENT maintains readiness through training, exercises and operations. Building upon successful exercises in fiscal years (FY) 2009 and 2010, USARCENT continues to develop capabilities and interoperability with partner nations through the planning and execution of major binational and multinational exercises: USARCENT conducted 12 exercises and approximately 150 theater security cooperation events in FY 2010. Building stronger partnerships with more robust capacities will continue with exercises such as Friendship Two and Bright Star 2011, planned for February and September/October 2011, respectively.

Friendship Two is a bilateral field training exercise conducted by the United States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Originally conceived by the commander, U.S. Central Command, and Saudi Assistant Minister of Defense and Aviation Khalid bin Sultan, the Friendship series of exercises was intended to integrate U.S. and Saudi armor and mechanized forces in field operations. Having successfully executed Friendship One in spring 2009, USARCENT and the Royal Saudi Land Forces plan to continue building integrative capabilities in February 2011 with Friendship Two. Such exercises focus on generating forces, sustaining logistics in combat and conducting combat operations with international partners. The exercise will also move beyond the traditional focus on conventional conflict, considering irregular warfare and emerging regional threats.

Bright Star began in 1981 as a biennial U.S.-Egyptian military exercise. Through the years, Bright Star has evolved into a multinational exercise, integrating new partner nations and expanding their integrated capabilities. Bright Star 2009 featured more than 180 air, ground, maritime and special operations military activities among joint services from 11 nations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ready Tonight, Sustain the Fight, Shape the Future!
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.