Mobilizing, Training and Deploying Reserve Component Forces to Meet Combatant Commander Requirements

By Miller, Thomas G. | Army, October 2010 | Go to article overview

Mobilizing, Training and Deploying Reserve Component Forces to Meet Combatant Commander Requirements


Miller, Thomas G., Army


First Army mobilizes, trains and deploys all continental U.S.-based Army National Guard and Army Reserve forces mobilizing in support of operations around the world. First Army is a multicomponent command with a complex structure composed of a headquarters, two divisions, 16 training support brigades (TSBs) and 103 training support battalions located throughout the continental United States.

First Army's current expanded mission capability relies heavily on mobilized troop program unit Army Reserve soldiers and augmentation from Operation Warrior Trainers - a program in which redeploying reserve component soldiers can remain under Title 10 status and assist First Army with training follow-on forces.

We incorporate operational experience, the Battle Command Training Program (BCTP), combat training centers (CTCs), warfighter's forums, the Army training network, Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) centers of excellence arid the Joint Warfighter Center to advance lessons learned from both war and transformation initiatives. First Army uses the combined arms training strategies and active component mission plans to provide the framework for planning reserve component unit training to ensure that similar mission sets have a common training concept regardless of component.

As Forces Command's executive agent for reserve component training support, First Army provides training across a broad set of mission requirements including Operation New Dawn in Iraq, Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan, Kosovo Force, Joint Task Force-B in Honduras, the Multinational Force & Observers in Egypt, the Horn of Africa, Guantanamo and Operation Unified Response in Haiti.

Trainers from First Army's two divisions - Division East at Fort Meade, Md., and Division West at Fort Hood, Texas - incorporate the latest Army doctrine while collaborating closely with the deploying unit's leadership and subject-matter experts to develop and execute a comprehensive training plan tailored to the unit's mission. These training plans build on the unit assessment and detail all required training events and resources needed to fully prepare for its theater mission. This collaborative process, as outlined by the Department of the Army Pre- and Post-Mobilization !raining Execution Order, has been integral in maximizing the effectiveness of mobilization training time by developing a single, integrated training plan that enables all necessary training requirements to be validated for combat.

Since 2001, First Army has mobilized nearly 700,000 servicemembers from all branches of the military in support of combatant commander requirements. Ln 2010, First Army will have trained nearly 70,000 soldiers, sailors and airmen, and organized into more than 1,300 units with diverse missions including division headquarters, expeditionary sustainment commands, brigade combat teams for full spectrum operations, combat aviation brigades, security force, counter-rocket artillery and mortar, counter-improvised explosive device (IED), base camp command and control, the air defense mission in the National Capital Region and twoperson dog teams. In practice, First Army trains the entire depth of the reserve component modular force.

The reserve component units that First Army mobilizes, trains and deploys perform an integral role in the execution of conflict response and are fully integrated with active component units. The 34th and 36th Infantry Division Headquarters deployed to Iraq as command-and-control headquarters for active duty brigades within their sector. The National Guard's only Stryker brigade combat team (SBCT), the 56th SBCT, deployed to Baghdad and conducted full spectrum combat operations alongside active component brigades. The expeditionary sustainment commands deployed to Afghanistan and exercised command and control of logistic operations for all deployed units in theater. The first National Guard battlefield surveillance brigade (BfSB), the 67th BfSB, deployed to Iraq and provides direct support to U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mobilizing, Training and Deploying Reserve Component Forces to Meet Combatant Commander Requirements
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.