Freeman vs. Satloff: A Debate to Remember

By Hanley, Delinda C. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, September/October 2010 | Go to article overview

Freeman vs. Satloff: A Debate to Remember


Hanley, Delinda C., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


The Nixon Center in Washington, DC was the scene of a rare debate, on July 20, about whether Israel is really a strategic asset or a strategic liability for the United States. Gen. Charles G. Boyd, a Nixon Center fellow, moderated the debate on a subject which he described as often discussed privately but rarely in public. [After days of waiting, the Nixon Center finally permitted the Washington Report to attend the debate, held in a small conference room with a few select audience members.] Ambassador Charles Freeman, Jr., former U.S. envoy to Saudi Arabia and China and now chairman of Projects International, and Dr. Robert Satloff, executive director of the AIPAC-spinoff Washington Institute for Near East Policy, had quite different views on the topic.

Dr. Satloff called the special U.S.-Israeli relationship "a strategic bonanza for the U.S.: not just an asset, but a downright bargain." We "share ways of governing, ways of ordering society, ways of viewing the role of liberty and individual rights, and ways to defend those ideals," he emphasized.

According to Satloff, Israel is on the front line, facing many of the same threats Americans face. He listed military advantages that Israel brings to the U.S., including storing American war reserves in Israel and sharing "effective counterterrorism and counterinsurgency tactics," which he said have played an important role in America's fight in Iraq. "Israel's intelligence, its technology, lessons learned from its own experience in counterterrorism and asymmetric warfare, have saved American lives," Satloff contended. "Our relationship with Israel is not just good for Israel, it's good for America," Satloff concluded. "What we really need in the Middle East are more Israels...strong, democratic, reliable, pro-American allies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Freeman vs. Satloff: A Debate to Remember
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.