Women's Film History: Columbia University and the Museum of Modern Art, March 2010

Framework, Fall 2010 | Go to article overview

Women's Film History: Columbia University and the Museum of Modern Art, March 2010


Museum of Modern Art, Warner Screening Room

Round-Table: Columbia University Seminar-"Cinema and Interdisciplinary Interpretation" & WFHN (UK/Ireland)

Reviewing motivation and progress in construction of women's film history-from Women Film Pioneers to Women and Film History International.

Moderator: Drake Stutesman (Framework, The Women's Film Preservation Fund)

Christine Gledhill: "Introducing the British/Irish Women's Film History Project"

Bryony Dixon: "Transnational Stories-Women and Their Films Crossing Borders-Archival and Research Issues"

Screening: Daisy Doodad's Dial (Turner Film Company, 1914). Directed by Laurence Trimble. Cast: Florence Turner (Daisy Doodad) and Larry Trimble (Husband). (app. 10 min. si., b&w, 35 mm; NFTVA; LOC print).

Mark Garrett Cooper: "Tackling Universal Women as a Research Problem: What Historiographic Sources Do and Don't Tell Us about 'Gender' in the Silent Motion Picture Studio"

Screening: Alas & Alack (1915, Universal). Director: Ida May Park. Scenario: Ida May Park. Cast: Cleo Madison, Lon Chaney (app. 15 min. si., b&w, 35 mm; NFTVA; LOC print).

Jane M. Gaines: "Traveling Women and Silent-Era World Film Distribution as Paradigms" (e.g., Gene Gauntier, Florence Turner, Marion E. Wong, Margaret Turnbull, Stephanie Socha)

Session 1: Traveling Women: Confronting Problems & Issues

How does the internationalism of the film industry and border-crossing of personnel impact practically on researching, constructing, and interpreting women's film history? What problems have women's film history researchers encountered?

Session Chair: Antonia Lant (New York University)

Monica Dall'Asta: "Challenges of Researching Worldwide Distribution + Pearl White Reception and Frieda Klug as Distributor"

Elaine Burrows: "Historical Overview of NFTVA/BFI Collection Development Policies as They Have Impacted on Gender and Nation Questions"

Clare Watson: "Pursuing Women Publicists from the UK to the USA"

Session 2: Gender and Nation: Transnationalizing Women's Film Histories

What are the conceptual/interpretative implications of national cinema histories and the existence of national archives for the construction of women's film history? Does nation exceed gender? What is the connection between gender, nation, and women as filmmakers? How far does putting a national box round filmmakers suppress (or obscure) their cross-national activities and relationships between filmmakers, film forms, and transnational influences?

Session Chair: Christine Gledhill (PI, Women's Film History Network- UK/Ireland)

Antonia Lant: "Women's Writings on Cinema as a Source of Questions of National Identity and Vice Versa: The Discoveries of The Red Velvet Seat"

Emma Sandon: "Reconfiguring British Cinema History's National Borders: Empire, Women, and Filmmaking"

Ruth Barton: "The Daughters of Erin Go to Hollywood: Occupational Mobility, Irish Women and Transnational Cinema"

Session 3: Historicizing the Recent Past: Digitization, Transnational Practices, & Future Histories

How do questions about women's filmmaking practice get reframed after Second Wave feminism and in the context of postfeminism? …

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