Celebrating AJS as a Membership Organization

By Johnston, William D. | Judicature, September/October 2010 | Go to article overview

Celebrating AJS as a Membership Organization


Johnston, William D., Judicature


I was honored to become president of AJS on August 6, 2010 at the conclusion of the meeting of the Society's Board of Directors in San Francisco. David Riehen, Editor-inChief extraordinaire of Judicature, has given roe about 600 words to work with for the purpose of this "President's Report." My first official act is to try to do my best to comply with his friendly admonition.

After thinking about it, it seems to me that the 600 words can be boiled down to three: "Thanks," "Thanks," and "Thanks."

First, thanks to Immediate Past President Carole Wagner Vallianos. Her leadership this past year was outstanding, made that much more so when one considers that at the same time she was continuing to serve as interim CEO of a major healthcare organization, LA Biomed. Carole, we have all benefited greatly from your leadership.

Second, thanks in advance to fellow AJS board members and officers, to Honorary Board members, to members of the AJS National Advisory Council, to members of all AJS committees, to members of the AJS state chapters (Hawaii, Texas, and State of Washington), and to AJS Executive Director Seth Andersen and the other talented and dedicated staff professionals in Des Moines and Chicago for their work on behalf of AJS in the year to come. It is only through our continued partnering that we can hope to live into the mission that the very name of AJS reflects: "The American Judicature Society to Promote the Effective Administration of Justice."

Finally, and most importantly, thanks to you, the members of AJS. In August, we launched the Society's Centennial Celebration. We have much to celebrate indeed: Establishment in 1913 as a national, nonpartisan membership organization, with members to include judges, lawyers, and non-lawyer citizens concerned about ensuring access to a fair and impartial justice system.

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