Compassionate Conservatism VS Bush Doctrine/CONSERVATISME COMPATISSANT VS DOCTRINE BUSH

By Soltani, Fakhreddin; Jawan, Jayum A. | Cross - Cultural Communication, September 3, 2010 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Compassionate Conservatism VS Bush Doctrine/CONSERVATISME COMPATISSANT VS DOCTRINE BUSH


Soltani, Fakhreddin, Jawan, Jayum A., Cross - Cultural Communication


Abstract:

George W. Bush compared his administration plan for Pre-September the 11th with Post-September the 11th and declared that the first one was designed for internal issues such as helping parents, developing good character in American children, and strengthening a spirit of citizenship and service in the United States; but the second era changed the ways that was planed for past. Defeating evildoers and bringing them to justice shaped the way United States has to pass. In contrast to pre-September the 11th which had been called conditions of peace; the new condition after September the 11th was recognised as war condition and was declared as necessary war that is necessity of United States' future security and freedom of American children (Bush, 11 October 2001). This article is to study perspective of George W. Bush and his administration on security strategies of the United States in pre-September the 11th (Compassionate Conservatism) and post-September the 11th era (Bush Doctrine).

Key words: Compassionate Conservatism; September the 11th; Bush Doctrine; Preventive War; United States; Security.

Resumé: George W. Bush a comparé ses plans d'administration avant et après le 1 1 Septembre et a déclaré que le premier avait été conçu pour des questions internes telles que l'aide aux parents, le développement de moralité chez les enfants américains, le renforcement de l'esprit de citoyenneté et de service aux États-Unis; mais la seconde période a changé la façon conçue pour le passé. L'idée de battre les malfaiteurs et les amener en justice a façonné la manière dont les États-Unis ont à passer. Contrairement au pré- 1 1 Septembre, qui avait été appelé l'état de paix; l'état neuf après le 1 1 Septembre a été reconnu en tant que l'état de guerre et la guerre a été reconnue nécessaire pour la sécurité des États-Unis et la liberté des enfants américains. (Bush, le 11 Octobre 2001). Cet article étudie les perspectives de George W. Bush et son administration sur les stratégies de sécurité des États-Unis dans les périodes avant le 11 Septembre (conservatisme compatissant) et après le 1 1 septembre (doctrine Bush).

Mots-clés: conservatisme compatissant; le 11 Septembre; Doctrine Bush, guerre préventive; États-Unis; sécurité

1. INTRODUCTION

For about half a century, war against communism and Soviet Union was basis of United States foreign policy and security strategies. United States' presidents described the Soviet Union and Communism by the phrases such as atheistic, fanatical, satanic and menacing totalitarian state (Edwards, 2008). End of the Cold War inevitably influenced foreign policy and security issues of the United States. United States found itself victorious in the long war against Soviet Union and the as the sole super-power in post-Cold War era. In following, the first Bush declared "New World Order" (Haley, Apr 2004 ) as the ordering condition of the new era.

But end of the Cold War made a problem for United States; lack of adversary. Communism and Soviet Union had shaped United States foreign policy for defining its security and threats against security; but in new era after Cold War it could not be functional way for purpose of United States to shape its objectives of security and foreign policy (Edwards, 2008). So, United States' presidents attempted to create new concepts for defining their foreign policy and threats against security. In regard to that, collapse of Communism created vacuum of threat and power for United States; it was the beginning of United States strategy to prevent any "potential competitors" against its leadership that was goal of liberal grand strategy for providing security in United States (Ikenberry, Sep 1, 2002).

The threat of communism was substituted by threat of rogue states. So, small scale military actions, humanitarian interventions, and peace keeping in favour of world order increased. Expansion of NATO and its transformation from military alliance to political one was an instrument for accomplishing of operations for new missions (Betts, 2004).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Compassionate Conservatism VS Bush Doctrine/CONSERVATISME COMPATISSANT VS DOCTRINE BUSH
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.