Let's Require Our Kids to Study George Washington

By Neal, Andrea | The Saturday Evening Post, November/December 2002 | Go to article overview

Let's Require Our Kids to Study George Washington


Neal, Andrea, The Saturday Evening Post


SPEAKING OUT

It is not possible to study the father of our country without also studying the concepts of morality, liberty, virtue, and the Creator.

Forget the Pledge. When it comes right down to it, there's nothing in the Pledge of Allegiance that teaches children the value of our incredible country. A better requirement would be to study George Washington. I challenge any federal judge to strike down a law "to require the teaching of George Washington's life, political philosophy, and personal virtues in every grade in every school in the land."

No doubt the politically correct would seek an injunction to stop the law from taking effect. I can only imagine their concern for children exposed, against their will, to concepts such as morality, liberty, virtue and the Creator.

Their dilemma would be understandable because it is not possible to study Washington without also studying those things. It is not possible to study the origins of the United States without studying the relationship between God and liberty-a relationship that the Founding Fathers understood implicitly.

That we are a nation "under God" was so obvious to George Washington and his

peers that they felt little need to belabor it in their debates about the Constitution. Their concept of separation of church and state did not envision a wall between God and state. Their focus was on the need to avoid a state-established religion, like the one that so infringed on the religious liberty of their forebears in England.

Those who seek to purge God from the public marketplace involve Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson (the closest thing to 18th century secular humanists) in the defense of their views. Yet both of those men signed the Declaration of Independence, which was unequivocal about God's role in endowing humankind with political rights. Both were clear in their belief that the new system of American government was built on a morally superior foundation to prior governments, and that foundation was from God.

Jefferson said in 1781: "And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever."

Yes, it took the United States the good part of two centuries to fulfill the promise of the Declaration of Independence-that all men and women, regardless of race and resources, are created equal. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Let's Require Our Kids to Study George Washington
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.