Editor's Note

By Valdivieso, Sybila | Women & Environments International Magazine, Spring 2010 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Valdivieso, Sybila, Women & Environments International Magazine


On July 28, 2010, the United Nations General Assembly declared, for the first time, that access to clean water and sanitation is a fundamental human right. The historic resolution was put forward by Bolivia and co-sponsored by 35 countries with 122 countries voting in favour and 41 countries abstaining. There were no votes against the resolution.

UNICEF has said that 40% of the world lives without adequate sanitation and that more than one billion people have little or no access to clean drinking water. The ones most affected by this crisis are women because they are the primary caretakers of the home, the ones who search for water, who tend to crops and who raise children. For the same reasons, women also suffer disproportionately from the push to privatise water in developing countries. However, it is important to point out that women have also fought back and in many cases have developed workable public mechanisms for meeting the needs of their communities for clean water and sanitation. Their expertise needs to be considered. This issue of WEI provides a link between and insight into gender and this water crisis while reinforcing the concept that any solution to the problem needs to include the participation of all.

WEI thanks all the contributors who shared their words, perspectives, art and insight on this issue. We also thank the issue coordinator Genevieve Drouin for her dedication to ensuring this issue was developed. A thank you also goes out to the entire issue team consisting of Sarah Atchison, Sara Burgess, Genevieve Drouin, Sonja Greckol, Karla Orantes, Dayna Scott and Elliot Spears.

WEI was started up, and is currently run and managed, by a team of dedicated volunteers with a variety of community and academic experience without whom this publication would not be possible. Having said that, of course content is our top priority. But we cannot deliver the content you want without your feedback! We invite as much feedback as possible. As a result of what we have been hearing back from you, we have made several changes to the WEI dynamic. In the upcoming months, we will be updating our website to introduce our online store and we will be updating our back issues information over the next few months, with selected articles from the past 34 years to show you how far we have developed. As 2011 marks the 35th anniversary of WEI's existence, we will also be inviting you to a very big party sometime in 201 1 . We will keep you posted.

Please note that we are currently working on the following topical issues: women, ageing & poverty and our themes for 2011 will focus on labour and food security. If you wish to apply as a volunteer editor, please email us. What is required? Resonance with WEI's mission and editorial experience.

If you would like to receive an e-mail announcement when a new issue of WEI is published, or when a call for submissions goes out, please send us your name and email address.

Finally, we want to extend a special thank you to Karla Orantes, WEI's Managing Editor for the last two years as she moves on to other feminist adventures and to welcome our new Managing Editor, Sharmila Shewprasad, a long-time friend and supporter of WEI.

Thank you everyone for your support to date, and we look forward to sharing our content with you in the future

[Sidebar]

Putting This Issue Together

Sarah Atchison has graduate degrees from Northern Ireland in peace and reconciliation studies and human rights law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Editor's Note
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.