The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century

By Shaw, Benjamin | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, December 2010 | Go to article overview

The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century


Shaw, Benjamin, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century. By Mark F. Rooker. NAC Studies in Bible and Theology. Nashville: Broadman & Holman, 2010, 248 pp., $24.99.

Given the extensive secondary literature on the Ten Commandments, my first response to Mark Rooker's work is to ask the question, "What can it say of significance in two hundred pages?" The answer is, "Quite a lot." The book begins with an introductory chapter that provides an overall context for the Ten Commandments, not only in their biblical and ancient Near Eastern (ANE) setting, but also regarding their use in Jewish and Christian ethics. Among other things, Rooker discusses the background of the commandments in the context of ANE law codes, as well as the perpetual question of the enumeration of the commandments. He also comments briefly on the two listings of the commandments (Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5).

Following the introductory chapter, the book devotes a chapter to each commandment in sequence, using the traditional Protestant enumeration. Each of these chapters follows the same order: a comparison of the commandment to other ANE law codes; an exposition of the commandment itself, often focusing on key words (especially important with regard to Commandments 6 through 10); the broader OT usage of the commandment; the NT use of the commandment; and a concluding section that deals with application to current ethical issues. It is important to note at this point that, while most of the commandments clearly have their ANE counterparts, two of the commandments stand out in this respect. There is nothing equivalent to, or approaching, the Fourth (Sabbath) Commandment or the Tenth Commandment (coveting) in any of the ANE codes. That observation in itself clearly sets the Ten Commandments as body of law or of moral statements apart from its ANE context - a point well made by Rooker.

The final chapter provides a summary of conclusions in which Rooker addresses such things as the interrelationship of the Ten Commandments and their setting in the context of salvation history. Among the more important sections of this chapter are his discussion of "The Church and the Law," "The New Testament and the Law," and "The Moral Law and the Natural Law. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Ten Commandments: Ethics for the Twenty-First Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.