Little Debbie

The Journal of Pan African Studies (Online), December 2010 | Go to article overview

Little Debbie


Debbie Downer died today

Downed a molotov cocktail straight to the head.

So no more crying, bitching or, remorse to come later

Just dried blood-laced tears that once trickled down her face.

Cause Debbie was the sucker

Feeding her soul off of half-shaped hearts

While beating her chest to rebellious drums.

Too bad Debbie couldn't see herself...the black widow she was.

Always mourning her death before it arrived

With her own iron fisted gloves to blame.

I said, Debbie Downer died today!

She downed a molotov cocktail straight to the head.

So no more yelling, running/hiding or, regret to come later

Just charred pieces of her fragmented selves were left behind.

Cause Debbie was too afraid to just be...

Hoping one day that she'd just be found

While pounding pain beat away.

Too bad Debbie ain't leave no suicide note, before burning the candle at both ends.

Maybe I would have saved her...

Or found just enough material to write her eulogy.

© Amy "Aimstar" Andrieux, 2007

aimstar 5/17/02

What do goddesses do when they get lonely...

They remember justice

They imagine victory

They work

Sow

Reap the benefits of being god

... by sharing their talents with others

Some goddesses delve deep...

And purge their sins

Some purge their pain...

But most engulf self whole-heartedly

Selfishly tasting the sweet buds of what it is to live

They build

They create

They envision better worlds

Plan

Execute game strategies with love

... until their dreams come to fruition

when goddesses get lonely

goddesses actualize themselves

reaffirm themselves

they get focused. …

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