From the Editor

By Merz, Judith R. | Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

From the Editor


Merz, Judith R., Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin


As this issue of the Bulletin goes to press, a controversial documentary about education, Waiting for Superman (Paramount, 2010), is in movie theaters, launching a discussion about the alleged failures of the U+S+ public educational system. Interestingly, filmmaker Davis Guggenheim frames the critique through the stories of five students struggling to obtain the best education possible, thus putting a face to those who are waiting for someone to 'save them" from weak educational systems* Although his suggestion that charter schools and education reformers may be the "Superman" waiting in the wings is arguable, Guggenheim's focus on the students' lens is right on target. Ultimately, educators need to be concerned about doing the right things for the young people in their classrooms and schools - and at its heart, such right-minded action perhaps best defines this issue's theme of morality in education.

Well-intentioned bureaucratic reform efforts in the United States and elsewhere often emphasize doing things right by imposing rules and requiring excessive documentation of efforts and results, but the real morality in education ultimately lies in doing the right thing for students* ?? and in helping them learn to do the right thing as welL As the articles in this issue attest, many superwomen in Delta Kappa Gamma are already thinking about and pursuing the hard work of shaping not just the minds but also the hearts of young people. Like mild-mannered Clark Kent, Superman's alter-ego, these educators quietly and persistently go about the daily tasks of interacting with students, challenging them to grow and develop into productive adults. …

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