PASSAGES: William Howard Taft

Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, Spring 2011 | Go to article overview

PASSAGES: William Howard Taft


William Howard Taft, professor emeritus at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, died Feb. 21, 2011, in Columbia, Mo. He was 95.

Taft was born Oct. 24, 1915, in Mexico, Mo., to Raymond and Ferrie Taft. He started working for newspapers in junior high school, starting with the Mexico Ledger, which paid for his college education. A graduate of Mexico High School, Taft received a bachelor's degree in 1937 from Westminster College, where he was its public relations director and covered his own graduation, the speaker for which was FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Taft then earned a bachelor's degree (1938) and master's degree (1939), both in journalism, from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Drafted in June 1941, he served nearly five years in World War II, being commissioned a second lieutenant in the Infantry. Transferred to the Army Air Corps in Orlando, Fla., Taft attended combat intelligence school and served in Rapid City, S.D. By early 1945, he was stationed in Pratt, Kan., as intelligence officer with a B-29 group. Taft's group was headed for the Pacific theater when President Harry Truman ordered the dropping of atomic bombs. In 1951, he received his doctorate from Western Reserve University (now Case Western Reserve University).

Taft taught at Hiram, Youngstown State, and Defiance colleges in Ohio before joining the Memphis State College (now the University of Memphis) faculty in 1950. There, he established the Department of Journalism and worked part-time on the Memphis Commercial-Appeal copydesk. In 1956, Taft moved to the Missouri faculty, where he taught the school's History and Principles of Journalism classes to more than 10,000 students before his retirement in 1981 as associate dean and graduate program director. At Missouri, Taft chaired about one hundred master's theses/projects and about twenty-five doctoral dissertation committees. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

PASSAGES: William Howard Taft
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.