An Experience of Peer Education Model among Medical Science University Students in Iran

By Peykari, N.; Tehrani, F. Ramezani et al. | Iranian Journal of Public Health, January 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

An Experience of Peer Education Model among Medical Science University Students in Iran


Peykari, N., Tehrani, F. Ramezani, Malekafzali, H., Hashemi, Z., Djalalinia, Sh, Iranian Journal of Public Health


Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of peer education among university students for reproductive health promotion based on researchers' experiences.

Methods: This interventional study was conducted in Qazvin University of Medical Science during 2002 to 2004 through stakeholders' partnership and selection of 24 volunteer students according to their knowledge, interest, communication skills. Capacity building was performed through holding an interactive reproductive health coarse contained marital health, illegal abortion, family planning, STI/AIDS, communication and counseling skills. Trained peer educators have introduced to other student and present education and counseling formally and informally. A post interventional study was conducted after 9 months in order to find its effectiveness.

Results: In our experience Stakeholders' partnership in community interventional programs led to the best expected availability of better health through ownership and adopting policies. In present study, the proper determined criteria for selection of peer educators and clear understood expectations of the peer educators' role were very important in health promotional program. Although peer education was acceptable program for university students, more support and supervising for peer groups are needed. The students believed that the power point of peer education and counseling related to same age groups sympathy, confident, well behaved, cheerful, and kind-hearted and peer educators awareness.

Conclusion: Universities are appropriate real world for experience a friendly youth program and then disseminate it to other young communities. There seems peer education is effective strategy for reproductive health promotion and reinforce positive behaviors in youth.

Key words: Peer education, Reproductive health, University students, Iran

Introduction

A peer group is a group with the same age, social status and interests (1). Peers provide a context for sociable behavior, personal relationship and a sense of belonging (2). These characteristics of peer group lead to consider peer education as an effective behavioral change strategy in reproductive health world wide. In the youth world, reproductive health information is available but it may be transferred in a manner that is not adapted to the young people's values and life style.

Young peers have a strong influence on their risky and safe behaviors. In this regard, peer education is an effective way for reproductive health promotion, because it is a communication between equals and this equality lead to sympathy and empathy.

For recognize the power of peer education in the world of the youth, some studies have been performed in Iran and other countries. A study demonstrated that peer education is an effective method for HIV/AIDS knowledge promotion and safe sex behaviors (3). Similarly, other studies showed that peer education in STI/AIDS prevention programs in high school and college students is effective in both knowledge promotion and change behavior intention long term (4, 5).

Another study showed; during the evaluation of peer education program for adolescents achieve the results in effectiveness of peer education on STI prevention and family planning knowledge increase (6). By the way, in conducted a FGD in Thailand youth said that they did not like formal reproductive health counseling in governmental centers and they preferred youth friendly centers and informal contact with counselors (7).

One of the dominant themes in a performed FGD in Iranian medical science university was peer education. This study's participants believed that peer groups are similar and these similarities make possible better understand and acceptance of viewpoints positively. They could influence them non-judgmental and non-authoritarian. In addition, they said that university students need a youth friendly counseling center for reproductive health subjects (8).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

An Experience of Peer Education Model among Medical Science University Students in Iran
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.