IN MEMORIAM: Len Pennington 1930-2010

By Fagan, Tom | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, March/April 2011 | Go to article overview

IN MEMORIAM: Len Pennington 1930-2010


Fagan, Tom, National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


BY TOM FAGAN

Leonard William Pennington, Jr. was born on April 14, 1930 in Arlington, VA and died on October 15, 2010 in Madison, WI. He earned his BS degree and MS in applied psychology from The College of William and Mary in 1952 and 1954, respectively. I am often surprised at how little I know about so many leaders in the field, despite the prominence of their contributions. According to his obituary (http://Madison.Com/obit/i65844), Len worked as a military intelligence specialist for the U.S. Army (1954-1956) and in the army reserves until 1962. Years before the founding of NASP in 1969, and before we met in the 19703, Len served as the first director for Central Wisconsin Colony's Development Evaluation Center, and then as a senior supervising school psychologist for the Madison Public School District. Before those positions, he provided psychological services to other agencies including the Oregon (WI) School for Girls, the Wisconsin Diagnostic Center, and the division of family services for the Wisconsin Department of Health and Social Services. He began his long and distinguished tenure with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction in 1968 and retired from the DPI in 1989. During those years he fostered the growth of school psychological services and training programs throughout the state.

Len was a charter member of NASP and appears to have continued his membership until the mid-1980s. He served as NASP delegate from Wisconsin in 1972 and 1973, and was a regional director from 1978-1980. As a cochair of NASP's Accreditation, Credentialing, and Training Committee, Len had primary responsibility for the preparation of NASP's Standards for the Provision of School Psychological Services, first published in May 1978. During the same year he served on the committees that published NASP's Standards far Training Programs in School Psychology, Standardsfar Field Placement Programsin School Psychology, and Standardsfar Credentialing in School Psychology. He later served as a representative to the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Len was active in the National Association of State Consultants for School Psychological Services, a group founded in 1976. He served as its treasurer in the late 19705 and continued to be active with the state consultants group into the mid-igSos. Though a member of the American Psychological Association from 1958 to the late 19705, he was not listed as a member of its Division of School Psychology. …

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IN MEMORIAM: Len Pennington 1930-2010
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