Code of Ethics on the Environment

Parks & Recreation, November 1997 | Go to article overview

Code of Ethics on the Environment


Preamble

The National Recreation and Park Association believes that park and recreation citizen and professional advocates, whether at the local, state or national level, have an environmental responsibility to assume a leadership role in conserving the quality of the natural environment. This belief originates from the recognition that the critical relationship between human activity and the natural environment includes our urban parks, greenways, open spaces, historic and cultural sites and our vast wildland and marine reserves.

Park and recreation advocates can carry out this responsibility by the creation and implementation of policies and practices which promote environmentally sensitive planning, management, and development and by integrating environmental education into the quality recreation opportunities made available to their constituents. In doing so, they provide an example and promote sound environmental practices and lifestyles among the constituents that they serve. Through high-quality recreation experiences, the public will nurture a sense of reverence, connectedness and stewardship for the natural environment, and develop its own environmental ethic.

Code Of Ethics

All park and recreation advocates, because of their special responsibility to assure resource accessibility for today, resource protection for tomorrow and high-quality environmental experiences for all, subscribe to the following basic tenets of conduct:

Purchase and use environmentally safe and sensitive products for use in facility and park operations, taking into consideration the effects of product production, use, storage and disposal.

Implement management practices and programs which help to conserve and protect water and soil, enhance air quality and protect wildlife.

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