Personal Insurance

By McNichol, Kathleen S. | Journal of Risk and Insurance, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Personal Insurance


McNichol, Kathleen S., Journal of Risk and Insurance


Personal Insurance, 4th edition, by George E. Rejda, Constance M. Luthardt, Cheryl L. Ferguson, and Donald R. Oakes

INS 22 is a course that requires insurance industry novices to master voluminous amounts of information. This can be a daunting task for anyone. Having taught insurance for 18 years at the collegiate level, it is safe to say that I have never met a student who initially feels that reading about insurance and insurance policies will be a captivating experience. It is a necessary evil in the minds of some. Facilitating the learning process becomes an important aspect of what the educator must accomplish. Personal Insurance accomplishes this goal through a clear and concise writing style, reader-friendly layout, and a relevant context for discussion of important concepts, which help students manage the educational process.

The language is appropriate for the typical INS student who does not have an extensive background in insurance. Important terminology is displayed in the margins for easy identification. A personal risk management case is introduced in the first chapter that makes it easy for students to relate the information that follows to their own situation. A rationale for insurance products and the risk management process becomes clear. Insurance contract language is easier to read when one sees some personal relevance in the process. After all, we all buy insurance products at some time in our lives.

Another effective technique is the discussion of current issues in different lines of insurance. Giving students insight to some of the current regulatory, legal, and social issues related to personal lines of insurance creates an interesting context within which to discuss the mundane contract material. Chapter 2 discusses the role of auto insurance in society. The importance of compensation to accident victims, the pros and cons of no-fault insurance, and issues of rate regulation are clearly delineated. In Chapter 12, a description of health care problems in the United States precedes the discussion of the policies and provides a perspective about affordability and availability that better prepares the student to understand the importance of the contracts.

The automobile policy and homeowner's policy are covered in a traditional way.

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