From the Editors

By Geider, Thomas; Neemann, Harold | Marvels & Tales, January 1, 2011 | Go to article overview

From the Editors


Geider, Thomas, Neemann, Harold, Marvels & Tales


In this issue of Marvels & Tales, we note with sadness the untimely passing of two colleagues who were still in the prime of their careers - Thomas Geider and Harold Neemann. Both of them made important contributions to fairy-tale studies, not only as scholars and teachers, but also as exemplary colleagues of all and as dear friends to many in the discipline.

Thomas Geider

Thomas Geider was born on 29 April 1953 in Bonn, Germany. He majored in geography, ethnology, and African studies in Bonn and Köln and completed his doctoral studies in 1989 at the Universität Köln with his widely acclaimed dissertation, Die Figur des Oger in der tradiäonellen Literatur und Lebenswelt der Pokomo in Ost-Kenya (Köln: Koppe, 1990). This two-volume study has achieved canonical status in the scholarship on the oral literatures of Africa, the field that was the focus of Thomas's research and in which he has made a lasting imprint. Other important projects followed this early masterpiece, including his Habilitatxonsschñft for the Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Motivforschung in Volkserzählungen der Kanurí (Tschadsee-Regon): Ein Beitrag zur Methodenentwicklung in der Afrikanistik (Köln: Köpper, 2003). During his career, Thomas taught and conducted research at universities in Maiduguri (Nigeria), Bayreuth, Mainz, Köln, Leipzig, and Frankfurt. Known for his work on African folktales and Swahili literature, Thomas was also the coeditor of Swahili Forum, a contributor to the Enzyklopädie des Märchens, and an adviser for The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales and Fairy Tales. In 2007 he was named an außerplanmäßigen Professor at the Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, and since 2008 he worked in the Institut für Afrikanistik at the Universität Leipzig. …

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