School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference: Success All Around

By Proctor, Sherrie; Zibulsky, Jamie et al. | National Association of School Psychologists. Communique, May 2011 | Go to article overview

School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference: Success All Around


Proctor, Sherrie, Zibulsky, Jamie, Comerchero, Victoria, National Association of School Psychologists. Communique


The 2O11 School Psychology Research Collaboration Conference (SPRCC) was held on February 2Oth and 2ist in San Francisco, CA, prior to the National Association of School Psychologists' (NASP) annual convention. The purpose of the SPRCC is to provide early career scholars (i.e., pretenure scholars and scholars who are within 2 years of having obtained tenure) the opportunity to interact with one another as well as with seasoned researchers, or "catalyst scholars," within the field of school psychology. The ultimate goal for the SPRCC is to encourage multisite, collaborative research projects that address issues relevant to the practice of education and school psychology.

PARTICIPANTS

Early career scholars. This year's SPRCC participants included 29 early career scholars: Amy Briesch, Angela Canto, Nathan demons, Victoria Comerchero, Allison Dempsey, Erin Dowdy, Marlene Sotelo-Dynega, Jamie Fearrington, Erin Rotheram-Fuller, Bryn Harris, DeMarquis Hayes, David Hulac, Kwon Kyongboon, Amanda Marcotte, Melina KellerMargulis, Sterett Mercer, Scott Methe, Amity Noltemeyer, Julia Ogg, Michelle Perfect, Eric Pierson, Sherrie Proctor, Mathew Quirk, Maria Rogers, Amy Scott, Geraldine Oades-Sese, Amanda Sullivan, Sara Whitcomb, and Jamie Zibulsky.

Catalyst scholars. In addition, seven catalyst scholars facilitated small group discussions based on their expertise and the early career scholars' research interests. The catalyst scholars and the corresponding group each facilitated included: Craig Albers (Assessment and Intervention: Language and Culture), Rachel Brown-Chidsey (Academic/Behavioral Assessment and RTI), Ted Christ (Curriculum-Based Measurement), Randy Floyd (Cognitive Assessment and Health Issues), Russ Skiba (Multicultural Issues and Resilience), and Louise Spear-Swerling (Reading Interventions). The catalyst scholars, all of whom are prominent researchers, took time from their busy schedules to provide invaluable guidance to the early career scholars. From the moment the catalyst scholars were introduced on the first day of the SPRCC until the closing session, these accomplished professionals went above and beyond to greet and assist all of the early career scholars. Most notably, early career scholars had the unique opportunity to work with catalyst scholars in small focus groups, discussing specific details of current studies as well as exploring broader questions facing the professioa During the less structured events held during the conference, catalyst scholars took the time to eat meals and chat casually with early career scholars, creating a welcoming environment that made everyone feel at ease.

Invited panelists. Seven other seasoned scholars also participated on two panels during the conference. Past SPRCC attendees James Connell, Andrew Livanis, and David Shriberg reflected on their experiences during and after their respective SPRCCs. These scholars shared helpful suggestions for getting the most out of the conference and maintaining collaborative relationships for years to come. Through their eyes, we came to see our fellow attendees as colleagues who had the potential to help each of us more clearly articulate our own research questions and diligently pursue answers. …

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